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Fringe Update: Episode 2 Ratings Up + Review September 17, 2008

by Anthony Pascale , Filed under: Fringe , trackback

Fringe, the new mystery genre show created by JJ Abrams, Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman, got a big boost in the ratings for its second week, with a little help from Fox’s hit show House. We have details and a mini review of episode 2 "Same Old Story" below. 

 

4 million more tune in to Fringe
Last week’s premiere of Fringe brought in OK numbers and so a big test for the show was going to be week two, and the good news for the Abrams team is that it passed the test. Fringe won its time slot in both overall viewers and those in the key demographics bringing in a total of 13.4 million, four million more viewers than the premiere. An obvious help to the show was following Fox’s hit medical drama House, which brought in 14.4 million viewers, and together Fringe and House helped Fox win the night. 

Review – Fringe episode 2 – "Same Old Story"
While the $10 million 90 minute pilot for Fringe felt more like a film, the second outing settled in and felt more like series television, which is actually a good thing. You can start to see how the show is going to work, with a scary opening teaser introducing a mystery, a meeting of the ominous ‘committee’ that oversees the investigations into ‘The Pattern,’ flowing into a procedural show with our main characters solving the case, but at the same time hinting at the larger overall mythology.

Forgoing a ‘previously on Fringe’ the post-credits segments went long on exposition and review of what happened in the pilot, which dragged a bit, but were probably very useful to first-time watchers (and as the ratings shows, that was probably a good call). It has been a stated goal that the show will not be one of those that require you to watch every episode (like Lost or Heroes), but hopefully the show doesn’t end up having to repeat itself too often.

The mystery of the week involving super-rapid aging and a serial killer was interesting, but a bit predictable. What was promising is how ‘the monster of the week’ plot was actually tied into the mythology of ‘The Pattern’ and the Massive Dynamics Corporation. There were just enough Lost-style hints and new mysteries introduced (including the shows final image) to keep mythology-obsessed fans going and wanting more. Also the ‘fringe science’ of the week (recapturing images from a dead body’s optic nerve) provided a nice gross out moment for horror genre fans.

As for the character relationships, there was improvement across the board in this area from the pilot with some poignant scenes between all the shows main cast with John Noble (Walter Bishop), Lance Reddick (Phillip Broyles), and Blair Brown (Nina Sharp) so far pulling most of the load. However, the chemistry between Anna Torv’s Olivia Dunham and Joshua Jackson’s Peter Bishop is starting to shape up nicely and we can see the beginnings of an arc for the two (let’s hope they don’t take this into romance and ‘will they / wont they’ territory too soon). Also the cow made a brief cameo, but Noble continues to provide most of the show’s comedy.

So far so good with Fringe. The challenge for the show going forward will be to balance the procedural mysteries of the week with the overall mythology as well as continuing to develop the characters and give them arcs for the audience to want to make the show ‘must see TV.’


Death doesn’t stop Fringe team from questioning people

Watch episode and extras online
If you missed it, you can watch the show online at Fox.com, in HD. Plus Fox has a full recap and also a bonus feature of ‘Walter’s lab notes.’ It is worth touring around the official site as it is clear that FOX is using the web in a very proactive way to both extend the Fringe experience as well as help fans catch up with the show if they miss something.


[CLICK to watch FRINGE online]

 

 

Comments

1. I'm dead Jim - September 17, 2008

WOO HOO!

2. Energize - September 17, 2008

It was even worse than the pilot. This show has good potential, but the characters and situations are too far out. At least LOST worked.

3. AJ - September 17, 2008

I was a bit underwhelmed, but le’ts all remember TNG’s wonderful “Code of Honor” as a post-pilot masterpiece.

Fringe can be great. Just keep John Noble CRAZY.

4. Sisko Is The Prophet, Peace Be Upon Him - September 17, 2008

I thought the pilot was just OK, but the second episode was more intriguing. I am a bit worried about the show falling into the monster of the week mode and sappy romance between the stars. So Orci if you are reading this…please don’t do that. Lets see more mythology, less sap.

5. VERG - September 17, 2008

Who cares about Fringe…. BRING ON THE TREK!!!!!!!!

6. Trekkie16 - September 17, 2008

I liked it better than the first episode and I thought the writing was wittier. I like the humor and I LOVE Lance Reddick. I wish he was in every scene. Still thoughts part were a bit unrealistic and some of the writing was still predictable. Still not WOWING me like LOST did but I enjoyed it enough to tune in next week.

7. montreal paul - September 17, 2008

I loved the show last night… more so than the pilot… and I thought the pilot was good. I think the characters show some real promise and I love the relationship between them all. Anna Torv’s character should really develop over time. She seems to be a mix of both Mulder and Scully. I actually like Jackson in this.. I hated him in everything else he has done.

I tend to agree with the people who mentioned to stay clear of any romance between the Torv & Jackson’s characters… that would be a huge mistake! I think the chemistry between them right now is great. I like the FBI guy too (the friend she called in a favour from).. although I don’t remember his name.

Keep up the great work and this will be a hit!

8. ensign joe - September 17, 2008

The pilot seemed a little to “pop” for me.. I will give it (Fringe) a couple more looks though as it does show promise..

I also found it hard to believe that.. well… here you have this guy.. this agent.. who’s skin is going bonkers.. and he’s in a basment of a Harvard building.. not at, say, some sort of official medical facility under quarantine.. or AT LEAST under guard.. just saying.. too nit-picky?

9. Dr. Image - September 17, 2008

Peter Bishop comes off as an irritating tool. All wink-wink, “aren’t I clever” lines. It’s like he’s from another show- of the type I avoid watching.
I’ll take Lost over this any day.

10. Energize - September 17, 2008

If they recast Joshua Jackson’s part for a more likeable guy it would be a lot better.

11. star trackie - September 17, 2008

Good episode last night. My only complaint is that it doesn’t follow The Sarah Connor Chronicles on Mondays…that way I could knock them both out with one sitting. Oh well. Fun show so far.

12. Adam T. - September 17, 2008

Some of you people drive me crazy! Good TV is very nearly an oxymoron these days. There are stills tons of shows that are insipid and bland, yet get tons of viewers. So the masses will always crave fluff and garbage, fine. At least this show is adding another hour of enjoyable viewing to the crowded schedule of crap. Lighten up a bit folks, its good Sci-Fi the likes of which we haven’t seen in a while.

13. rehabilitated hitch1969© - September 17, 2008

Sorry OrcSter, I wasn’t able to catch it – I was riding the wings of the Lunesta© butterfly after a highly stressful day. However, I shall torrent this episode tonight, burn it to dvd for me and the child and let you know your brilliance once again. as the case may be.

THE WOMEN!!

=h=

14. montreal paul - September 17, 2008

# 13…

Question for you I have been meaning to ask… when you write “THE WOMEN” … are you referring to the new movie coming out by that title?

15. Arthur Simone - September 17, 2008

TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK TREK

16. Arthur Simone - September 17, 2008

In Brazil we cannot watch FRINGE yet…

17. J_schinderlin56 - September 17, 2008

Sorry, I think that this show is gross.

18. J_schinderlin56 - September 17, 2008

People dieing and melting on airplaines, and newborn babies becoming Aliens is just too disgusting for my taste.

19. The Enterprise - September 17, 2008

The first episode had such a great opener, but the rest of it was crap or hard to believe, This show won’t last.

20. zan - September 17, 2008

I watched the pilot on Sunday and I thought to myself that “Spock’s Brain” was more realistic

21. Thorny - September 17, 2008

I TiVo’d “Fringe” last night while watching “Eureka”. Partly because I was eating dinner and that was a serious mistake while watching the pilot last week. Yuck.

Mr. Orci, we’re not going to have any face-melting or see-through skin in Star Trek, are we? :-)

I’m about to give up on “Sarah Connor”, the writing is just awful (what’s with that nuclear power plant having worse security than your average Walmart?), so I hope Fox leaves “Fringe” where it is on the schedule.

“House” and “Fringe” back to back after “Eureka” departs on its mid-season break. That’s entertainment!

22. The Enterprise - September 17, 2008

Really? I think Terminator has been great. The writing on that is better than Fringe, I think. I like the action of Terminator.

23. montreal paul - September 17, 2008

babies turning into aliens????? what show was that? Um.. it was the rapid acceleration grown of the baby turning it into an old man.. not an alien.

for the rest of you thinking that the show is unrealistic… umm.. yes.. IT’S A SCI-FI TV SHOW. Not a documentary on Discovery. LOL

To quote the show. “When did you lose your imagination?”

24. zan - September 17, 2008

“IT’S A SCI-FI TV SHOW”

yeah one that forgot about the “science” in “science-fiction”

25. rehabilitated hitch1969© - September 17, 2008

yo Montreal Paul®, no Montreal Paul®. Most certainly not and I would never do this. While I celebrate women in general, and am a major fan of womanhood. It can mean many things to many people. As it should like any Pearl Jam lyric and Eddie Vedder won’t tell us the meaning. Make your own meaning, make the song your own he says. However.

I am of course referring to the classic “Dr. T and the Women” starring Richard Gere. Insert gerbil joke anywhere. I know Richard Gere and he’s OK with that old chestnut. That dude’s just an American Gigolo – has had more tail than Chaz Sheen and Bill Clinton combined. So it’s all laughs to him, all the way to the box office bank. In Texas we have an old saying about that.

THE WOMEN!!

=h=

26. Cyberghost - September 17, 2008

why all the complaints, Fringe is a good show with a lot of potential. What would everyone here want to see? All American Idol -yuch- or reality shows. It’s different, and I think that most of us can agree we need that!!

Give it time, all shows need time to gel, the writers, the viewers and the cast, need time. If it’s not your cup of tea, that’s fine, but my TiVo is set to “season pass” for this one.

Years ago fox had a show on tv about space marines, written by Chris Carters co creator of x filed, it didn’t get a chance, does anyone remember the name of the show? You know, back when fox tv was a young, daring, netwok, and the simpsons was still funny. Pre 1999 timeline.

27. montreal paul - September 17, 2008

24 – Zan….

you forgot the FICTION in Science Fiction. Otherwise, it would be Science Non-Fiction. ;)

25. rehabilitated hitch1969©

Thanks for clearing that up! lol. I just didn’t know what you were referring to and it was driving me nuts! lol. Oh, and say hello to Rich for me.. love his movies.. I think he’s a great actor.

28. Spock - September 17, 2008

The show is boring. The characters uninteresting, and the stories are just re-used X-files episodes.

29. Thomas - September 17, 2008

I wound up missing most of last night’s episode due to school, so I’ll catch it online. I think this will be another big hit for JJ, et al. And yes, please stay away from delving into the romantic angle too soon, if at all. It would be such a jump-the-shark moment.

30. KennyB - September 17, 2008

It warms your ass……………….LOVE WALTER

31. ster j - September 17, 2008

Walter Bishop has all the good lines. As for his son, I keep seeing Ray from E.R. (the intern that lost his legs), but he had some sweet moments with his dad this week.

32. Capt Mike From the Terran Empire - September 17, 2008

I liked it. I thought it was great. Not as good as the Termanator the Sarah Connor Chronicles. But still good. Some people don’t like fringe and thats ok. If it is not your cup of tea then don’t watch.

33. Chuck Watters - September 17, 2008

Lighten up all —- If this was the first si-fi show everyone would think it is spectacular . We are too spoiled with what came before. Sit back and enjoy and stop be such demanding and comparing pains in the ass .

34. Thorny - September 17, 2008

22. The Enterprise… “Really? I think Terminator has been great. The writing on that is better than Fringe, I think.”

I think the writing is very weak on Terminator. This week, we had a ludicrous storyline about infiltrating a nuclear power plant, and on top of that, after having their previous house blown up, car totaled, etc. John Connor just walks right on back into his High School like nothing happened. No precautions about Terminators there waiting for him. No police on the lookout for him. Nothing. Nada. And then the Connors & Co. just rent a fully furnished house (evidently in the same community, since John still goes to the same school), no questions asked by the lessor.

Whatever.

Sorry, I liked Terminator at first, but the writing staff seems to have had a lobotomy over the summer.

35. montreal paul - September 17, 2008

31 – Ster j
That was a different actor (Shane West) that played Ray in “ER”. Joshua Jackson was on “Dawson’s Creek”

33 – Chuck Watters

Thank You!!

36. Jai1138 - September 17, 2008

26. You’re thinking of Space: Above and Beyond by Glen Morgan and James Wong.

And it was a really good series. Good performances characters. decent early digital space combat effects, and more than a few exceptionally memorable episodes; it should have lasted more than one season. I think Ron Moore and David Eick’s Battlestar Galactica owes more than a little to it.

37. Xai - September 17, 2008

I liked it and will continue to watch. It’s not Lost… but for all but a few apparently in the dark…it’s not supposed to be.

15. Arthur Simone – September 17, 2008

grow up

38. Doug L. - September 17, 2008

re 26 & 36…

Dead on 36, I remember it too. Always thought of it as a nod to BSG in some ways at the time.

re Fringe, I’ve been a big fan of these creators, but Fringe leaves me a little flat so far. I don’t by Pacey’s character or his motivation for being there. Seems to me a bit forced to give up whatever all he was doing to hang around with his dad in the basement.

Doug L.

39. AJ - September 17, 2008

Xai:

I think the idea behind “Fringe” is to get out of LOST territory, and get to the ‘magic’ 7-season number for syndication without worrying about episode order.

Let’s face it, the show’s premise is sound. I see Denethor and his friends every day on the Long Island Railroad’s platforms. Fringe has cash behind it. “Bash” it nicely, my friends.

40. Kirk's Revenge - September 17, 2008

Space: Above and Beyond rocked!
I remember a great episode in which a veteran pilot (an old salt type) is training the crew and keeps using the phrase, “Easy as pancakes.” After the guy is killed, the crew pay tribute to him by blowing their breakfast (pancakes) out the airlock. Very poignant and a bit surreal.

Anyway, too bad Fox blew the show out with the flapjacks.

41. Nigel - September 17, 2008

I gave Chez Fringe another chance. If I were Gordon Ramsay, my message to Head Chef Abrams, Sous Chef Orci and Chef de Parti Kurtzman would be “Your food is cr@p!”

The writing is awful and acting not too far behind. I hope my corporate masters put a bullet between the eyes of this dying beast straight away indeed.

42. starfleetmom - September 17, 2008

It’s not really curdling my cream…I’ll give it one or two more weeks to tickle my fancy. The first two episodes were kinda stupid.
I didn’t like Terminator/Sarah Connor at first, and now I love it, so I’m trying to keep an open mind about Fringe so far and give it another look next week. But I’d much rather do without the gross out-scenes like the eyeballs hanging out and the brain surgery while awake…that’s more horror than sci fi. The characters don’t excite me and the science part of sci-fi is sometimes ridiculous….like let’s take some LSD and stick an electrode in our head while floating in water in the dark and we can communicate to the dead. sheesh. I do have an imagination….I just think Fringe mucks it up too much!

43. Charles H. Root, III - September 17, 2008

I don’t know who the Fringe series science advisor is (none is listed on IMDB) or if they have one, but it’s insulting.

I am legally blind in one eye due to a retinal detachment. I can tell you from personal experience what happens when the eye tissue dies.

The eye is the only part of the brain that is externally visible. We all know what happens when you cut off oxygen to it. The optic nerve and rods and cones of the retina will degrade rapidly. My fiance and cousin, who are both medical doctors, laughed at the premise that you can extract the last images someone saw before death from their bodies.

It’s like saying you can plug your USB webcam into a special CSI sniffer/hacker computer and extract the last images it captured…. Right.

Nope, sorry. That’s not how it works.

Even if you willingly suspend disbelief, the bridge is not the last thing she saw prior to death. Unless of course they expect us to assume that the human eye has a Borg memory buffer in it.

Next thing you know they are going to have an episode where they recover dinosaur and Neanderthal DNA from some French cave, then Jurassic Park it into two living creatures, extract their memories and try telling us people and dinosaurs roamed the planet together.

Fringe? Fringe Science? More like Junk Science. Maybe they should have named the series “Junk” instead.

44. Cyberghost - September 17, 2008

#36

Exactly, thanks for jogging my memory!! I thought the show was good, and b4 the age of the Internet, at least in the form it is today. Shows were on for a on for a while, then gone. At least now if you have fair warnig the show is done, u don’t have to waste your time getting into a show and poof, it’s gone.

45. DJT - September 18, 2008

Damn.

This whole time I thought Hitch was referencing Spock’s line in the “The Cage”.

46. planettom - September 18, 2008

I realize the show’s “superscience” plotlines are going to border on “supernatural”, meaning, don’t think about them too much.

But you know, I can accept a rapidly aging person (the baby at the beginning).

What I can’t accept is one who gains mass without eating anything.

47. tbh - September 18, 2008

nobody has a problem with joshua jackson reviving the dead girl with two metal rings attached to a generator … i don’t know why, but that part irritated me the most.

48. sean - September 18, 2008

So I assume you folks that are complaining about the ‘science’ of Fringe can never sit still during an episode of Star Trek, The X-Files or LOST, either? Because honestly, nothing portrayed in Fringe so far is any more absurd or far-fetched.

49. Charles H. Root, III - September 18, 2008

Much of it bothered me. Writing and acting… Not just the eye thing, the home made defrib or the rest of the junk science.

If you want me to buy the fact that you are extracting memories from the dead then wave a Harry Potter magic wand or perform some supernatural ritual on the corpse. But please don’t insult my intelligence by doing it with some fancy laser unit.

And sure, Lost, Star Trek and many shows all have moments of scientific inaccuracies. But remember that Star Trek is in the future. The technological advances between now and then help explain some of the absurdities. Fringe is in our era so the writers don’t have that luxury.

50. rehabilitated hitch1969© - September 18, 2008

The Rootster™ is very upset.

And why not with the bum eye and all. I don’t know, I didn’t really read it too closely. Thats a shame, too, because I have 2 pretty good working ones. Eyes that is.

Much illiteration in that sentence o’ mine. Do I still have it, or what??? Can a homie get a hollaback?

THE WOMEN!!

=h=

51. montreal paul - September 18, 2008

Why is everyone looking for realism in this? this is Science FICTION not Science Fact.

As someone stated before… EVERY science Fiction show is not based on Science fact.. Not Star trek, not lost (which takes place in present time btw), not Stargate, not Firefly, not Twilight Zone not even X-Flies. If you want realism.. .watch CSI or ER. Even those two stretch thing sometimes.

I don’t know about you guys.. but i like to watch science fiction to escape from th ereal world.. go to the world of what if…? Suspend belief and enjoy the stories. God, has everyone lost their sense of imagination?

What about The Time Machine by Jules Verne? NONE of that is possible.. yet it is an enjoyable and classic read. You don’t hear anyone saying.. well that’s impossible so it’s crap.

I just feel that most people on this board are so so negative about everything! About any aspect of the new Star Trek to Fringe and everything in between. Wow.

52. Jon - September 18, 2008

I too was bothered by the retinal camera. I mean, as if!

And then there’s that series where a vehicle goes far FAR past the speed of light with no effect on time or mass or the perception thereof just by creating some stable “warp field” (whatever that is) generated by two pencil-looking things.

As if!

53. pinky - September 19, 2008

It’s not about realism or about bad science… it’s that the science FEELS bad. Star Trek let us believe for an hour a week that we were in a spaceship (except Voyager– there was something wrong with the feel of that ship…) and let us see the technologies working just as they needed to. It’s not that Data couldn’t exist, it’s that Star Trek made us believe he did. Fringe isn’t suspending disbelief.

54. richpit - September 19, 2008

34. Thorny,

I agree with your take on the most recent Sarah Connor Chronicles episode. I like the show, but much of that was, as we say, ridonkulous.

55. Notbob - September 19, 2008

As I said, I would watch the 2nd and 3rd and, perhaps, even the 4th and fifth episodes to see if the show got more interesting.

After the first 30 minutes, I flipped to see what the UFO show on ABC was like for a few seconds. Before I knew it, I forgot all about Fringe.

I don’t know. It’s just my opinion which doesn’t count for much. I watched House without losing interest. But I guess the characters on Fringe just annoy me.

I watched the mad scientist–who annoys the crap out of me. Not because of the actor, but because it’s such a stupid character who’s not interesting. He’s a throughback to the old 30s B horror movies. And I thought, “all this weird crap happens and he’s the only one the government could find? When it came to the atomic bomb during WW II, the U.S gathered the greatest minds to build it. When it comes to dieases, there are tons of doctors studying and researching them. Hell, ABC had all sorts of scientists talk about UFOs. But this show says, weird crap is happening, and this is the only guy who can solve the problem. This and Joshua Jackson’s character is allowed to tag along. He can questions suspects and beat the crap out of them if he wants. He’s not an agent so his actions wouldn’t screw up the law’s case against the bad guys. Yeah, ok, sure.

Maybe I expected more. But I don’t think it’s that. Hell, a few years back I prepared to watch Supernatural, not expecting much, but I was pleasantly surprised because that show is actually damn good. Fringe, I don’t expect will be a show I’ll be watching too much longer. House, yes. Fringe not so much.

That’s just my opinion. I don’t know if the show will do well or not. I don’t really care. Dancing with the Stars and American Idol, which should have been called “Who wants to be a Fake Rock Star” (Simon Cowell said on one interview that Tom Petty wouldn’t have made it on his show; nor would Dylan. I guess he’s not interested in true tallent. The person who signed those two has got tallent not Simon.) is still on T.V. and I don’t know why people watch that crap.

56. Charles H. Root, III - September 19, 2008

@ 50. rehabilitated hitch1969©: The Rootster™…. Love it. Thanks!

@ 51. montreal paul: Fringe is not Science Fiction.

Just because someone says it is doesn’t make it so.

If there’s a story where some guy pulls a laser out of his pants and says he can read minds with it… well, that’s just silly. It’s a gimmick. Certainly not good eats or science fiction.

But if you have stories where someone talks about placing satellites in orbit to create a planetary communications network, or an adult wagon train to the stars, or an epic Lawrence of Arabia in space, then you’re a whole lot closer.

If Irwin Allen were alive and had a Sony HD Cam and green screens, Fringe is the sort of shallow, Monster of the Week nonsense he’d be making. There’s a reason why the greats like Asimov and Clarke had no love for Lost in Space, Time Tunnel or Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea.

They just weren’t that good. The Jetsons were better sci-fi. :)

It’s kinda insulting to have this dumb-downed, derivative, made-for-a-wider-audience claptrap passed off as something that it isn’t.

In 50 years, people will remember X-Files, I Love Lucy, The Honey Mooners, ST:TOS, Roddenberry, P.K.Dick, Frank Herbert, MASH and Monty Python. Hell, they’ll probably even remember Irwin Allen’s crap.

Now go IMDB JJ, Orci or Kurtzman. Look at their work, then me in the eye and tell me what they’ve done that will keep them in the collective pop culture memory in 50 years.

Yeah, I said it.

57. Xai - September 20, 2008

#56 Charles Root III.

“In 50 years, people will remember X-Files, I Love Lucy, The Honey Mooners, ST:TOS, Roddenberry, P.K.Dick, Frank Herbert, MASH and Monty Python. Hell, they’ll probably even remember Irwin Allen’s crap.

Now go IMDB JJ, Orci or Kurtzman. Look at their work, then me in the eye and tell me what they’ve done that will keep them in the collective pop culture memory in 50 years.”

Well funny… this show must have struck a nerve with you.
X-files: didn’t watch it… or either movie. And I LIKE science fiction.
Honeymooners (yes, 1 word), I Love Lucy: Sorry, I watched them as a kid. There’s no yearn to go back to nostalgia-land and see Lucy stomp grapes again.

MASH, Monte Python. Again I watched, and enjoyed. But pertinent in 50 years? No.

The same with the authors.

The point?
What do you want? Good entertainment or something you can point at in 50 years with a shaky finger and say “I remember that”.
None of your examples are current (except MP has a Broadway play “Spamalot”), yet you demand that these young men who ARE making a mark on movies and entertainment right now must have something you determine as socially redeeming or part of “collective pop culture”.

I understood…you didn’t like it. There’s a simple solution.

58. Ross - September 22, 2008

I have to agree with the sentiments here that some people are trying to draw too much realism from the fringe science we see in the show. It’s Science Fiction so please don’t read anything real into it – you’re simply ruining the experience for yourself.

If you’re involved with medicine and biology, for example, then simply switch off your training and enjoy a work of fiction – as a systems programmer and digital media developer I often have to ignore Hollywood’s portrayal of hacking and CSI-style photographic enhancement to rebuild a fingerprint from half a tiny CCTV video – it’s just not possible as they portay it, but it’s fiction so I don’t get worked up over it and just enjoy.

What I DO have a problem with so far is the Deus Ex Machina approach to the use of this pseudoscience. I have no problem with the Jules Verne concept of capturing the final images from a dead eye, but for Bishop to go from hypothesis based on a fictional work to SUCCEEDING on his first attempt with a piece of equipment Massive Dynamic just so happen to have lying around is so much more unbelievable than the concept behind the procedure in the first place.

The Steampunk-style approached used in the pilot was so much better – networking two brains together using a huge brass spike, a body-full of LSD and dumping you into a sensory deprivation tank was superb! And that’s how Bishop should stay – stuck with 70s tech and 70s ideas, Massive Dynamic are just going to be a Star-Trek style “I can fix this in the last 5 minutes of the show” device and will kill the show.

59. joe - May 27, 2009

am i the only one that was totally disturbed by the opening scene? really, do they have to use a gruesome, impossible and not even explicable situation to grab the audience’s attention? sure it’s just a TV show but come on, the rapidly accelerated pregnancy didn’t even have anything to do with the rest of the episode (catching the serial killer), they never used the dead man baby only a victim of the guy. and there’s no way the baby could have gotten enough nutrients to grow anywhere near that size before going on life support without first completely exhausting the mother’s nutrients and whatnot. the horrific scene is enough to bother me, but please, at least make up some potentially plausible even though impossible explanation.

60. biz - August 8, 2009

Fringe seems to be a is good TV series. It a bit similar to Torchwood and X Files. I just hope that it will not be spoiled.

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