TrekInk: Early Review – Star Trek: Countdown #2 | TrekMovie.com
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TrekInk: Early Review – Star Trek: Countdown #2 February 24, 2009

by Alex Fletcher , Filed under: Comics,Review,Star Trek (2009 film) , trackback

The first issue of "Star Trek: Countdown” showed us a surprising new friendship between Nero and Spock and finished with the shocker of a new Captain of the USS Enterprise, along with lots of tension between  Romulans, Vulcans and even the Remans. Issue two takes the next step in showing the events that lead up to the new Star Trek movie. Find out how that is all working out in our early review below. (SPOILERS)


 

 

REVIEW: STAR TREK – COUNTDOWN #2

The visit to Vulcan
As seen in the four page preview, this second issue picks up right where the first issue left off. (see TM review of Countdown #1). With the assistance of Captain Data and the crew of the USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-E), Nero and his crew are able to fight off the Reman attackers. The two ships head off toward Vulcan to receive a warm welcome… or not. In the meantime, the Romulans discover that the ‘senile Vulcan’ (aka Spock) was correct about the future of the Empire… but had understated things. It was going to be far worse than he’d guessed at.

Like the first issue, and not surprisingly, issue two has a lot of exposition, necessary to bring us through to the opening moments of the upcoming film. Mike Johnson and Tim Jones manage to carry the story with a certain sense of aplomb. There are plenty of references back to what we’ve previously seen in the Next Gen era, and explanations for what happened to Jean Luc (now Ambassador Picard), what the Vulcans really think of Spock’s plans for unification with their Romulan "cousins", and how exactly is Data alive after the events of Nemesis. [HIGHLIGHT INVISOTEXT TO FIND OUT: You guessed it, Data's neural nets were 'successfully imprinted' on B-4]

But at its heart, "Countdown" is an engaging tragedy about how Nero befriends Spock, only to suffer great disappointment in the midst of a massive crisis. By issue 2 we have yet to see Nero become the tattooed angry Romulan he will be in the upcoming film, but you can certainly see he is headed in that direction.  In addition to bringing us to locations seen in the TNG era (Enterprise & Romulan Senate), the comic also ties into the movie by showing us areas of Vulcan, such as the Vulcan Council seen in the trailer for Star Trek,


Apparently you are only able to view the Vulcan Council at an angle
(click to enlarge)

David Messina provides the art once again, and his style works well for this series, presenting things with a sense of shadows. Messina’s use of shadow and color really works well with the tragic nature of the story. There is also obvious use of some computer work in some of the scenes, including (as some have pointed out in the comments to the issue #1 review) some LCARS (aka Okudagrams) appear to be taken from the game “A Final Unity”. This is not a detraction by any means, and some of the space scenes are gorgeous and expansive, including the one in the Romulan astrometrics lab.


Did Romulans trade a cloaking device for Federation astrometrics technology?
(click to enlarge)

There are still some inconsistencies that have not been resolved between the first issue and this one, but they might still be sorted out in the last two issues of the series. Having said that, they don’t distract from the story, and, as with all Trek, a certain suspension of disbelief has to come into play to carry us through all of the events here. Regardless of all of that, "Countdown" is turning into more than just a prequel to the Star Trek movie, but also that send-off of the TNG characters that we may never see on film. Each issue of Countdown has also felt a bit short, but like the first issue, the second ends on a big cliffhanger, making the anticipation for issue three even greater. Overall, Countdown is is well worth reading for both comics fans and people who don’t usually read comics, but want to get the full movie experience and see how it ties into the whole of Star Trek.

Countdown #2 will be available in stores Wednesday February 25th. It comes with two covers: the regular with Data, and a Dealer incentive photocover, with Zoe Saldana as Uhura (from the Comic-Con poster).


Star Trek Countdown #2 cover A (click to enlarge)

NOTE: Data’s uniform on the cover is the TNG movie era style, but the uniforms used in the comics are based on the newer "Star Trek Online" style. The change in design was done after the covers were finalized.

Pre-order Countdown #2 – before it is too late
Issue #1 of Countdown sold out fast (and is now being sold for over $20). So it is a good idea to reserve your copies of issues 2-4 in advance at your local comic shop (or online at TFAW.com). Or you can wait until April and pick up the trade paperback, which includes all four issues.

Countdown #1

Countdown #2

Countdown #3

Countdown #4


(sold out)
available from Amazon resellers for $20+

 

$3.19
(Feb 25)

$3.19
(March)

$3.59
(April)

 

Star Trek Countdown
(Trade Paperback – compiling all 4 issues)

$12.23
(Pre-order – April. 29)

 

Comments

1. TonyD - February 24, 2009

Looks good and I like the tie-ins to the larger Trek universe; but I hate having to read a story like this in pieces over the span of several weeks. As such, I for one will be picking up the trade paperback in April.

2. McCoy's Gall Bladder - February 24, 2009

Since they’re all sold out, can anyone enlighten us about the B-4/Data schism?

Or did they reboot Lore?

What gives?

Cheers

3. Anthony Pascale - February 24, 2009

Issue 2 comes out tomorrow, it is not sold out

4. Dom - February 24, 2009

Frankly, I’m surprised that the Daystrom Institute hasn’t duplicated and improved on Noonien Soong’s work by now!

5. Dusk - February 24, 2009

4 – Indeed! Whatever happened to Cmdr. Maddox’s research?

6. Just Wonderin' - February 24, 2009

Is there ever going to be an explanation of how the hell Data is back? Maybe “Nemesis” really was just a bad dream, both in our universe and in the ST universe.

7. TrekDude - February 24, 2009

To #4 and #5:

I guess you could consider Soong being such a genius like Einstein… I guess even in the 24th century it’ll be hard for people to dublicate his work. His research in positronics has been groundbreaking and since he did not share lots of his work with many people they’re all left clueless and wondering how he has gotten his androids to work properly. ;)

8. Don Farnsworth - February 24, 2009

Mega mega geeky.

The artwork great but the dialogue is so bad. Romuland screaming “It’s all a Vulcan plot”. These are Romulans not Klingons who are barbaric by nature.

Nero’s buddy “Hmm risk everything on a remote chance of saving the empire, count me in” a rip off of Sulu saying something similar to Kirk when they were about to hijack the enterprise except these guys are bloody miners. No great adventure was ever likely theirs.

Also an advanced race like the Romulan’s are unable to tell that a planet is about to explode but spock can prove it by looking through a dicky little telescope on his back verandah.

Spock’s line “Not just any ship, not just any captain” is not something Spock would say with the exception of perhaps Kirk. “An old and dear colleague” in reference to Data who he has only met once.

Nope the Spock character in these comics is a cypher where fans can live what they would say and feel if there were there.

However the mega geekiness is intentional. The marketing guys were sitting around wondering how to market to the diehard fans. Those who will laugh hysterically at any in joke in the cinema just to let the audience know they get it.

They figured if they created a comic with the dickiest dialogue they would win over those fans too. A comic would not even be on the radar of the new audience it was trying to attract yet convince the nutters that all was well.

Yep the marketing guys laughed themselves to sleep the night they came up with this gem of an idea.

9. TrekDude - February 24, 2009

Came on to add that even Data himself didn’t manage to dublicate Soong’s work with the creation of his own daughter. ;)

10. Robert H. - February 24, 2009

Surprised no one yet has mentioned B-4. The possibility that B-4 took Data’s name after he finally assimilated Data’s memories and so forth.

11. James - February 24, 2009

I think the whole ‘Data’s death’ thing has been handled very poorly.

Granted, he shouldn’t have been killed in Nemesis anyway – it didn’t really make a huge amount of sense to the storyline, it could have been easily avoided, and it smacked very heavily of Spock’s ‘reactor moment’ in ST:II.

Having said that, to just suddenly bring him back somehow makes it worse – it cheapens his sacrifice, knowing that he wasn’t really killing himself ‘cos he was ‘backed up’.

Just my thoughts.

12. Steve - February 24, 2009

Hooray! Data lives. Simple explaination, saw it coming, very Star Trek 3. But hey, he’s alive and ticking. Should save anymore argument about it.

13. Matt - February 24, 2009

I agree James, but generally, the sacrifice of Data is still incredibly noble, because even if Data knew B4 would eventually manifest his personality (and at that point, he didn’t have any reason to believe it would work after it had failed) he is still ending his own existence. From his perspective, that moment on the Scimitar is his last, regardless of his cloned existence.

14. Paul B. - February 24, 2009

For those of you still wondering about why/how Data is back–did you not see the SPOILER text in the review above? The “invisitext” part?

Instead of just posting comments randomly, how about READING THE ARTICLE first? You know, as a courtesy to the fine staff here at Trekmovie, or even just–I dunno–because you want to find out the answers to the questions you keep asking?!

Thanks, Alex and Anthony, for another brief but useful review! I like that you give enough detail to pique our curiosity but not enough to ruin the comic for those who want to read it.

15. NaradaAlpha - February 24, 2009

#8–keep your antitrekker prejudice to yourself…. also: we have no idea how close spock and data became after data’s recovery

on a side note…heres an interesting theory on nero’s true origins…what if he’s spock’s SON and not fully romulan at all? maybe he is spock and saavik’s son? it would provide an added motivation for nero getting revenge against spock; a son enraged at his absentee father….

16. Alden - February 24, 2009

I think the Romulans didn’t trade a cloaking device to the federation, but instead to Professor X. That astrometrics looks like Cerebro.

17. cpelc - February 24, 2009

anyone else notice that it’s picard standing up there to the left of Spock in front of the council?

18. Don Farnsworth - February 24, 2009

@15
1. I’m not anti trekker. I am anti diehard who just want the movie to be like a bad tv episode.

2. We know that in the second comic Spock mentions that he had not seen Data since he was destroyed. Interesting seeing as Spock wasn’t there so most likely they have only met once.

3. I’ll put my opinions out there wether you like it or not.

19. Mike Ten - February 24, 2009

#16 Alden, The Enterprise-D astrometrics was around before Cerebro as shown in the X-men movie. I guess Patrick Stewart liked the set so much he took it with him to X-men.

I’m looking forward to seeing how the Countdown series ends.

20. Daoud - February 24, 2009

#18 Data had a life *before* 2364 and the start of TNG. It’s clear he was familiar with Spock already from a number of times before Unification. Plus, between Unification and Nemesis (when Data was destroyed) is about a 15 year period, much of which is not ‘onscreen’ and left unknown.

To your earlier comments, this comic had nothing to do with “marketing guys”. Alex Kurtzman and Bob Orci thought it might be fun to do. They came up with the story outline along with JJ Abrams, and with the movie being shifted from December to May gave them the time to pursue it with the comics staff, and gave time to the comics storywriters and artists to do it.

It’s clearly because of the rush to get it done that some of the dialogue is clunky. However, you’re very racialist to assume that all Romulans must be a certain way. All Klingons are not exactly the same. Gorkon was noble, Azetbur too. Gowron had a sense of right and wrong, that any Duras did not. Martok, Kor, Kang and Worf were all honorable. Koloth even. There’s a wide spectrum of behavior in any Star Trek alien race. The Romulans of the 2160 era were pretty conniving, and again in 2360. Not all Romulans were as honorable as Mark Lenard’s Commander, or even remarkable as was Linville’s Commander. The Romulans we’re seeing in Countdown (Nero and his associates) aren’t noble commanders, nor praetor’s guard, nor senators. They’re “common folk”. So that the storywriters went with dialectical language, is not at all unlike Geordi LaForge in the original TNG bible, and as seen in the first season of TNG. “Cool, man.”

21. Closettrekker - February 24, 2009

#18—”We know that in the second comic Spock mentions that he had not seen Data since he was destroyed. Interesting seeing as Spock wasn’t there so most likely they have only met once. ”

How do we know that? I must have missed that bit. When does Spock mention that?

To my knowledge, Spock has only referred to Data as “an old and dear colleague”. Since we are apparently looking at several decades after the events depicted in “Unification”, it seems to me that we do not really know how many times Data has interacted in some capacity with Spock.

#8—”Nero’s buddy “Hmm risk everything on a remote chance of saving the empire, count me in” a rip off of Sulu saying something similar to Kirk when they were about to hijack the enterprise except these guys are bloody miners. No great adventure was ever likely theirs.”

I see no similarity in the dialogue here and that of TSFS. And it is clear from issue #1 that Nero and his crew are quite close. It seems likely that there is some loyalty there.

I am not a veteran comic-book reader, so perhaps this is a bit of preconceived expectation, but this is–afterall—a comic book. Just what do you expect from the dialogue?

Spock’s line ‘Not just any ship, not just any captain’ is not something Spock would say with the exception of perhaps Kirk.”

Is Data “just any Captain”? Given his extraordinary abilities, I think it is perfectly logical for Spock to classify him as an extraordinary captain. I’m not seeing the problem.

22. Eric Cheung - February 24, 2009

I like that Picard’s an ambassador. It makes sense not only to the story, but to the character. Kirk warned him against promotion, “because while you’re in that chair you can make a difference,” but this isn’t an admiral’s desk job, it’s a very active role in diplomacy, something which suits Picard’s talents such that it would make a happy job for him.

23. SerenityActual - February 24, 2009

Looking forward to the graphic novel, as I don’t collect too many titles in monthly format any more.

24. New Horizon - February 24, 2009

21. Closettrekker – February 24, 2009
I am not a veteran comic-book reader, so perhaps this is a bit of preconceived expectation, but this is–afterall—a comic book. Just what do you expect from the dialogue?

I’ve read comics with exceptional dialogue over the years. Just because it’s a comic does not mean it has lack quality. Some of the best stories I’ve read have been in comic book form. It’s a comic book, not the daily ‘funnies’.

25. Dorothy Z - February 24, 2009

I’m sorry but that’s retarded. Data’s appearance (and explanation) is hackneyed and way too sentimental, not to mention a Search for Spock rip off.

26. Adam Cohen - February 24, 2009

SPOILER (sort of but not really): You know, technically Data “killed” B-4 when he overwrote his programming. Unlike Spock transferring his katra to McCoy (which was meant to be a temporary arrangement), Data has taken over B-4′s body completely and permanently. Bad android!

27. Paulaner - February 24, 2009

What’s wrong in the dialogue of Countdown?
Not all Romulans are military men and talk the same way.
Spock is an elder “man”, he is wiser and, in my opinion, is has learnt to accept his human half. It’s not the first time we see some emotional traits in his personality (the tears in TMP, his pride and delusion about Valeris in Star Trek VI and his feelings about Kirk).
By the way, do you want some bad dialogue? Generations is for you.
In the end, nothing in these previews is wrong, in my opinion. This a true reprise of TNG, and I’m very excited!

28. Mammalian Verisimilitude - February 24, 2009

Re: 22

Plus, Picard was an ambassador in the “All Good Things…” future.

29. Shatner_Fan_Prime - February 24, 2009

The fact that Picard is around and not looking much older seems to validate the theory that this story is not set “decades after Nemesis,” as some have claimed. I’d still like to know when these stories take place, but it’s looking more and more like the answer to that is: a handful of years after Nemesis.

30. Closettrekker - February 24, 2009

#24—”I’ve read comics with exceptional dialogue over the years. Just because it’s a comic does not mean it has lack quality. Some of the best stories I’ve read have been in comic book form. ”

I’ll have to take your word for that. Countdown #1 was the first comic book I had ever read. This was the kind of dialogue I expected. I would have been surprised to see a Star Trek comic where the dialogue was above the reading level of the average 10-14 year old boy.

Just out of curiosity, are there ‘Star Trek’ comics out there which can boast “exceptional” character dialogue?

31. Closettrekker - February 24, 2009

#29—”The fact that Picard is around and not looking much older seems to validate the theory that this story is not set “decades after Nemesis,” as some have claimed. I’d still like to know when these stories take place, but it’s looking more and more like the answer to that is: a handful of years after Nemesis.”

Perhaps, but it doesn’t seem to answer the question as to why Spock claims to have made Romulus his home for 40 years. That doesn’t seem to add up.

32. RD - February 24, 2009

Enjoy the last of the “tie-ins” with the old canon. Once XI starts canon from the “familiar” universe will be eradicated in favor of its new matrix in this new alternate universe, where nothing previously known has ever happened and the future has yet to be written. Who knows, this time Picard may chose not to fight that Nausicaan and disappear into obscurity. Data may never be discovered. Heck, THIS irresponsible Jim Kirk may not have been paying attention in his “Outsmarting cybernetic intelligence with street-logic 101″ class at the Academy and die at the hands of Landru.

33. subatoi - February 24, 2009

Too bad there are spoilers in the top of the article, a part that can be seen from the front page.
(I entered just to write this)

34. Athenian - February 24, 2009

Are these going to be released in a collected book form? Just curious because I have not been able to find them anywhere.

35. Athenian - February 24, 2009

Forgive me. Dumb question.

36. The Geek Who Gets Laid Often - February 24, 2009

32: ”Heck, THIS irresponsible Jim Kirk may not have been paying attention in his “Outsmarting cybernetic intelligence with street-logic 101″ class at the Academy and die at the hands of Landru.”

Actually, they plan to kill him off with a rare form of gum disease you can only contract when giving one of those ”smash-your-face-in-with-the-help-of-my-face” kisses that he’s so fond of.

Honestly, if they can make it work, I don’t care. It’s time for Star Trek to get good or GTFO (of film and tv).

37. Closettrekker - February 24, 2009

#32—”Enjoy the last of the “tie-ins” with the old canon. Once XI starts canon from the “familiar” universe will be eradicated in favor of its new matrix in this new alternate universe, where nothing previously known has ever happened and the future has yet to be written. ”

The alternate timeline has its origins in what you describe as the “familiar” universe, and in fact, is completely dependant upon the events depicted in all 5 television series and 10 previous films. It therefore makes no sense to view previously established canon and something which is “eradicated”, and certainly not as events which have never happened. Of course they did. If they had not—the “new” timeline could not have been formed in the first place. Star Trek “canon” has always had the potential to exist in multiple timelines.

Does McCoy not save Edith Keeler from the accident? Did that not happen? It sure seems as though it did, since everytime I watch COTEOF, I still witness the fictional reprecussions of it.

Is that entire event not a part of canon in your mind?

38. Will - February 24, 2009

Re: 37 Closettrekker

Not to nit-pick your logic on this, but you seem to be combining the eradication of a fictional timeline via the new movie with the existence of genuine material(in the form of episodes on tape/DVD/film) in the real world. As far as a logical argument goes, that’s like dividing by zero.

It’s almost as if, in my opinion, you’re saying that simply because the episodes and movies still exist for your viewing pleasure in the real world, the fictional timeline has not been eradicated.

A more proper argument on your part would have been to stick with the alternate universe idea of leading one character to another timeline and then following events from there. Were that your argument, it would both make sense for you to be correct that the existing universe leads to the alternate one of the new movie AND to say that the events of the existing timeline have been eradicated(or to put it less harshly, simply never happened here).

However, bringing in your witnessing of the fictional repercussions of a fictional event which you observe as an audience member to justify the continued in world existence of said event vastly weakens your reasoning.

39. NCC-73515 - February 24, 2009

It seems to be me who first wrote about the A Final Unity screen.

40. OneBuckFilms - February 24, 2009

38 – Star Trek has had it’s share of inconsistencies when it comes to time travel and alternate universes.

The movie’s alternate timeline was created by the Romulan’s trip back in time, presumably at the end of this comic book.

The other time travel stories generally happen thus:

a) Crew/Heavies go back in time, to change the past.
b) Crew make changes to the time line.
c) Crew travel forward in time, and when they check historical records, etc., they find that the changes they made were simply “meant to be”, or made no relevent difference. Nothing in the future was changed.

This movie postulates the following:

a) Crew/heavies go back in time (at which point a new universe is created).
b) Crew makes changes in timeline. Some permanent.
c) We follow crew in changed timeline.

Basically, the act of a) in both scenarios creates a parallel universe, as per string theory.

In short, the entire history of Star Trek, with a few exceptions, follows a specific path through one of the multiple universes created by their time travel. Never stated or portrayed, but that is the nature of the universe.

Most of the time, the changes are subtle enough that the crew’s return to the “Present” is simply not percieved or portrayed.

41. rangerone314 - February 24, 2009

I have no problems with idea of a split-universe timeline…

It is just like in microbiology: creature called a hydra undergoes fission into two creatures… which one is the “original” one?

42. NCC-73515 - February 24, 2009

Hydra has nothing to do with microbiology ;)

43. TrekTwenty - February 24, 2009

Im looking forward to reading the new comic…although there seems to be a lot of skeptics this time around. I’m not really looking forward to another trip to the comic book store to pick it up, though…

44. Montreal Paul - February 24, 2009

after reading and rereading everyones “theories”.. I have come to the conclusion that you guys put WAY too much thought into this. For God’s sake.. it is only a movie.. enjoy it for what it is.. enjoyable escapism. I don’t know about you, but I think enough at work.

You guys worry way too much about this stuff. Just relax people. You take this way too seriously. And I say this as a die hard Start Trek fan from way back. Enjoy it because when you start picking it apart and disecting it and contemplating it and taking it aprt even further.. it becomes less enjoyable. Seriously.. relax.

45. OneBuckFilms - February 24, 2009

41 – Universe Abrams is spawned from future events in Universe Prime.

Therefore, the universe seen from TOS thru to Nemesis is the original one.

Before the Narada’s arrival in the past, both universes are actually the same one.

The time travel arrival back in time is what actually spawns Universe Abrams.

46. OneBuckFilms - February 24, 2009

44 – I’m under no illusion that Countdown is a way of explaining the Reboot for us fans.

Most of us here enjoy looking into this, and it is part of our way of enjoying the Star Trek universe.

For me, it’s not worry, but anticipation, guesswork and discussion.

47. Paulaner - February 24, 2009

#44 “You guys worry way too much about this stuff. Just relax people. You take this way too seriously. And I say this as a die hard Start Trek fan from way back. Enjoy it because when you start picking it apart and disecting it and contemplating it and taking it aprt even further.. it becomes less enjoyable. Seriously.. relax.”

You, sir, are totally right!

48. Paulaner - February 24, 2009

#45 “Therefore, the universe seen from TOS thru to Nemesis is the original one.”

When the universe is filled with thousands of (known and unknown) space-faring civilizations, a lot of them capable to travel back in time, there is no notion of an “original” timeline.

49. Star Trackie - February 24, 2009

30 “Just out of curiosity, are there ‘Star Trek’ comics out there which can boast “exceptional” character dialogue?”

Check out Debt of Honor, it’s a damned fine TOS themed Trek graphic novel.

50. AJ - February 24, 2009

Paulaner:

The speculation on timelines is all part of the fun for some of us. Believe me, we’re not losing any sleep.

51. Mazzer - February 24, 2009

I like the conversation at the urinals in the first picture… the men’s room at the Vulcan Council.

52. OneBuckFilms - February 24, 2009

45 – There is an original. Every time someone goes back in time creates a new universe, however, one must exist in the first place.

Therefore, it is theoretically possible that neither universe (TOS etc., or the JJ Abrams universe) is the absolute original.

However, it is clear the Abrams universe is spawned from the Prime universe, aka the one where events from TOS thru Nemesis takes place.

51 – You should see the Urinal at the back of the Bridge, next to the Starboard Aft turbolift. ;-)

You see someone using it in the trailer !!!

53. opcode - February 24, 2009

Anthony:

Am I allowed to offer stuff for sale here? I am asking because I have a couple of extra Countdowns #1 here, mint in protective sleeve and would be glad to sell them to fellow fans that missed it.

54. Jefferies Tuber - February 24, 2009

You can’t kill an android, so long as his memory or neural nets are ‘backed up.’ In Data’s case, every time he uses the transporter, his identity is backed up. And if you can replicate his body-machine with technology as available as a coffeemaker, does that really qualify as ‘death’ under any reasonable interpretation of the word?

The Data/B-4 is a non story. Run along lil’ childrens.

55. Jamie - February 24, 2009

7 years mourning the loss of Data…

… Then I come to this page and discover Data has been brought back to life!

Talk about ruining an important moment by not giving it the drama it deserves. I’m guessing the comic doesn’t dedicate too much space to covering Data’s story.

Still, the way Data has been treated is nothing compared to the poor old EMH. He deserved so much more than the treatment he was given in Voyager’s Endgame — we don’t even know if he was shut down or allowed to continue living independently of Voyager.

The EMH can only dream of having a meaningless, unemotional death in a motion picture.

56. Admiral_BlackCat - February 24, 2009

Is it tomorrow yet?

57. Anthony Pascale - February 24, 2009

opcode, we dont really do that, but I suggest putting them up on ebay, I am sure someone will find them there

58. Syrnath - February 24, 2009

#42 Actually it does. Please see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydra_(genus)

59. Jovan - February 24, 2009

#15: Interesting hypothesis, but Nero’s heavy brow seems to suggest a new style of makeup for Romulans.

60. DGill - February 24, 2009

That tagline beneath the Vulcan Council image cracked me up. That shot in the trailer was probably the only visual reference the artist had.

61. DennyC - February 24, 2009

Regarding the “40 year” discrepancy, is there any canon establishing that the ROMULAN year is equal to a Terran, or for that matter a Vulcan year? Romulus could be orbiting closer to a smaller star at a higher rate of speed. After a time, Spock would likely start to mark the passage of time in the same way as the people around him.

Regarding Data “killing” B-4, I wouldn’t put it that way. There are at least two other possibilities: (1) as B-4 began to recall Data’s memories and enhanced capabilities, he CHOSE to assume Data’s identity as well; (2) it is also possible that an “overwrite” of B-4 (if that is what happened) occurred involuntarily, perhaps due to damage or simply because B-4′s programming was so flawed (Data wouldn’t be capable of CHOOSING to overwrite B-4′s memory unless his consciousness was already in operation). Perhaps B-4′s neural net was somehow destroyed and unrecoverable, but it was discovered that Data’s dormant programming was untouched. Fertrile ground for another series of comics, at least.

62. Shatner_Fan_Prime - February 24, 2009

#61 … “Regarding the ’40 year’ discrepancy, is there any canon establishing that the ROMULAN year is equal to a Terran, or for that matter a Vulcan year? Romulus could be orbiting closer to a smaller star at a higher rate of speed. After a time, Spock would likely start to mark the passage of time in the same way as the people around him.”

Sure that’s possible. But, c’mon. Methinks the writers just screwed up. Why would they confuse people by having Spock use a non-human scale of measuring “years” and not bother to explain it? If Spock had said, “My home for the last 20 years,” no one would have blinked (hard to believe, but his TNG crossover episodes happened 18 years ago!). But no, they had to say 40. No way he’s been there 40 standard years.

63. weerd1 - February 24, 2009

@52- Well, the original TOS expanded universe was obvoiusly the one from 70s fandom! Back when Starfleet Battles defined the maps of the Federation, and we knew the Federation formed in 2088, with the NCC-1701 built in 2188, etc. The movies came along a rewrote the universe… indeed, I did an article for a fanzine (back when the were still photocopied and mailed out) suggesting the timeline had been altered in some way between TOS and TMP, and TMP was the new timeline’s version of “The Changeling;” the Eugenics Wars were postponed until the 21st Century (Khan’s ’200 years ago I was a prince’ line); and Klingon physiology was drastically altered in the distant past. As much as I am a bit nervous about the new movie, it certainly wouldn’t be the first time we fans had to adjust to something new, because we THOUGHT we knew it all.

As far as the Data/B4 thing- I think it was dreadfully obvious Data’s programming was going to manifest in B4- in fact that last little whistled song drained any emotional impact Data’s death had in the film. It’s interesting to see Countdown doing a bit of cleanup on Nemesis similar to the way the last season of Enterprise did some cleanup on the first three. Data lives, Remans are apparently simple terrorists instead of slaves who managed to sneakily build the most powerful ship in the quadrant… Even if the new film is bad, at least this series is fixing some of that!

Then, something else to comment upon: I have a buddy who plays amateur soccer for a local league. She LOVES soccer. Tears herself up every game, plays her heart out, and limps for days afterward. She’s not getting paid, she’s not connected in any official capacity to soccer in any way other than it is something she enjoys. There’s no real reason for her to play so hard, or be so interested in the game- but it’s her thing, and I won’t disparage that.

I don’t get anything monetarily out of Star Trek. I just love it, and I love it enough that though it won’t ruin my life or my profession if Bad Trek hits, it will on some level affect me. It won’t ruin my life, nor should it- but I love nitpicking details, and I love digging into technical minutae, and I love shouting along with Shatner every time I watch “Where No Man Has Gone Before-” ONE JEALOUS GOD!!!! Every time. Because I love it. I ask those out there who do not have as deep a love and investment in this entertainment medium not to disparage my adoration with “it’s only a movie.” I know its only a movie, but its a Star Trek movie, and that means something more than just two hours of special effects this summer to a lot of people, whether it matters to the Grand Scheme or not.

Since I am being all long winded anyway, I also want to point out something to my fellow long time TOS fans, and bring all my comments full circle. Remember when we to sit around for hours coming up with why discrepancies were right instead of just bemoaning how wrong they were? When Vulcan in TMP showed up with a moon, though TOS said it didn’t have one, and we and book authors made T’Khut, Vulcan’s sister planet? Or how we explained Chekov being below decks in the first season even if we didn’t see him, because Khan knew him? Or why Kirk used “Space Central,” “UESPA,” and “The Federation Starfleet” interchangebly, and we came up with why different generations of starship service had different ways of talking about it? Or hours, and I mean HOURS spent determining what “NCC” stood for? All that willingness to sort it out came from our love for a poorly produced, short-lived little piece of TV magic that spoke to us on some level. I’m not saying we should be all smiles and dandelions if the new movie blows, but I do think we should all think about why we love Trek in the first place, and see if the new film meets THAT criteria- then if it does, we can nitpick the details and figure out why Kirk’s eyes are blue and Chekov doesn’t look like Davy Jones.

End of rant. Thanks.

64. Captain Joe - February 24, 2009

#62

I agree the real world explanation is most likely that it’s a mistake. However, considering the sophistication of Spock’s underground on Romulus it’s possible that he had been living there off and on for years before “Unification” using “secret diplomatic visits” as cover.

65. Montreal Paul - February 24, 2009

62. Shatner_Fan_Prime

“No way he’s been there 40 standard years.”

Why not??

66. harley3k - February 24, 2009

Even in such a short form as a comic book the story here seems more extensive than the entire Nemesis movie.

Well done. It almost makes me want to go back and watch Nemesis again…

67. Check The Circuit - February 24, 2009

#26 and #61

Or maybe B-4′s memories are part of the collective whole that is now Data. (Not unlike when Data downloaded his daughter’s brief life experiences into his system. He said she was “in him.”

68. sanyika - February 24, 2009

I seem to vaguely remember that it was mentioned in the TNG unification episode that Spock had been working on the reunification of the Vulcans and Romulans for decades, starting with meeting Senator Pardek at the Khitomer conference. I think Pardek mentioned he’d been friends with Spock for 70 years or something.

Who’s to say that Spock hadn’t secretly been traveling to Romulus for 40 years (as of Countdown)? Who’s to say that he wouldn’t have made Romulus his base of operations. It doesn’t conflict with anything we’ve seen and adds texture to already existing continuity.

69. Mammalian Verisimilitude - February 24, 2009

26> SPOILER (sort of but not really): You know, technically Data “killed” B-4 when he overwrote his programming. Unlike Spock transferring his katra to McCoy (which was meant to be a temporary arrangement), Data has taken over B-4’s body completely and permanently. Bad android!

But didn’t Spock kill the Vulcan priest at the end of TSFS in the same way?

70. Check The Circuit - February 24, 2009

Regarding multiple timelines….

Maybe the Guardian of Forever of circumvents quantum mechanics as part of its nature…leaving one cohesive timeline instead of multiple, fractured timelines. Or…since Kirk and Spock were able to correct the specific damage McCoy did to the timeline, a single timeline was re-established. (Had they failed, a splinter timeline could have been the result.)

We will have to wait and see on May 8th…but if Spock is not able to “fix” the tampering of Nero to the degree that Kirk and Spock did in City on the Edge of Forever…we wind up with a slightly altered “new” timeline.

I think the latter opens up some interesting storytelling opportunities…assuming the movie is successful and multiple sequels are ahead of us. In this new timeline, we get new (and some re-told?) tales from the era of the “Revised” TOS era. (I for one would love to see a more epic version of the Doomsday Machine. But because it is an altered timeline, no one character’s future is assured. It’s possible that someone other than an unfamiliar “red shirt” ends up dead. A scary proposition…but that’s the point. The drama is escalated because we really don’t know who comes out alive after a dangerous mission. (One of the “cheesy” or cliche elements of the TOS is resolved. We don’t know for sure who will be back for next week’s episode.) Pretty cool.

71. SChaos1701 - February 24, 2009

Since it’s sold out maybe there’s a place where they can be downloaded.

72. Shatner_Fan_Prime - February 24, 2009

#64 and 65 …

In the opening scene of Unification Part I, the admiral who briefs Picard gives the distinct impression that the Federation is quiet aware of Ambassador Spock’s whereabouts at nearly all times. When he goes missing, it’s a big deal.

Even if Spock – surely one of the Federation’s most famous citizens – had been making secret visits to Romulus prior to the events we saw onscreen, I just find it illogical that he would consider it his “home” for 20 years by the time anyone found out about it. A sloppy error on the part of the comic writers.

73. Devon - February 24, 2009

“Since it’s sold out maybe there’s a place where they can be downloaded.”

1.) Countdown 2 is not sold out
2.) There is always Ebay or Amazon.. or even your comic retailer.

74. tman - February 24, 2009

One very easy way to bring Data back to life is to add a new bedroom scene with Data waking up from a horrible dream (Nemesis). If you want to go for comedy, you have him in bed with Bob Newhart (those who know what I’m talking about have to admit that was the best way a TV show has been ended ever in the history of time!!!!)… If you want to go for tragedy, have Data in bed with Riker.

Hmmm, if someone posted that as a cherry on a DVD or somewhere on the internet, would that become canon?

75. Montreal Paul - February 24, 2009

72. Shatner_Fan_Prime

You still didn’t answer the question. Why couldn’t he have been living there for 40 years. He had been in negotiations for years previous to Unification. Shw me somewhere in writing where it contradicts that and i will believe you. Fact is.. there is nothing in writing anywhere.. we do not know what Spock considered home.. and for how long. Why wouldn’t the Federation or Starfleet know about this? Yes, he goes missing and that is a concern. But i doubt he has a tracking device on him. And how many years after Unification does Nemesis take place? How long is it from Nemesis to The comic? Unless it was stated somewhere.. i would say 5-10 years after nemesis. It was.. what.. 15 years from Unification to nemesis? (someone correct me on these dates if you know.. I am speculating) .. we know that Spock had been working on Unification with the Romulans for a number of years befpre the episode. So.. ummm.. I don’t believe that was sloppy writting at all my friend.

76. mike - February 24, 2009

i loved the first issue and cant wait to get my hands on the second. i hate being a nitpcker, but the only thing i dont like is the uniform that data and enterprise crew are wearing. i loved the FC-NEM uniforms

77. Julio - February 24, 2009

#63

That was the best post I’ve read on this site… I agree 100% with what you said!

78. BK613 - February 24, 2009

Of course the third possibility is this:

You travel back in time. The Universe you arrive in is the same one as from your past. All the matter and energy that was there before, is still there; it’s not a different Universe. How do you know it is your Universe? Because time is a dimension of your Universe, like height, width and length, and you have “simply” traveled back along its path.

You make changes but these changes DO effect your future because you are still in YOUR Universe. The quantum mechanical effects are felt but not in your Universe. As matter interacts differently than it did before, because of your changes, probability waves collapse differently than they did before in your Universe, meaning they also do so in other Universes.

You return to the future, finding that, yes indeed, your changes have had an effect in your Universe.

79. The Governator - February 24, 2009

This all sounds great. This prequel/sequel comic was an ingenious idea. It serves a sequel to both Unification and Nemesis as well as the new movie of the TOS era. This is the missing link we would have been denied had the movie come out at Christmas. We may not see the TNG crew again on film or series, but this gives them the departing story they were denied in Nemesis and sort of remedies its awfulness.

80. The Governator - February 24, 2009

Pardon the miscommunication. Here is the remedied post:

This all sounds great. This prequel/sequel comic was an ingenious idea. It serves as a sequel to both Unification and Nemesis as well as a prequel the new movie of the TOS era. If you think about it, it is pretty confusing. It is a sequel to where Star Trek last left off in the late 24th century, but it is a prequel to something which occurs over a hundred years in the past. Once again, this is an absolutely brilliant idea. This is the missing link we would have been denied had the movie come out at Christmas. We may not see the TNG crew again on film or series, but this gives them the good departing story they were denied in Nemesis and sort of remedies its awfulness.

81. The Governator - February 24, 2009

Also. I am really liking the tragic nature of the story. Some of the best works of literature ever produced were tragedies. So far, I am very intrigued. Yah sure, there is some cheesy dialog. But common people, this is a comic, not Shakespearean literature. So with that aside, it is a truly interesting story. I find it to be very well balanced as far as character development. We see that there is an emphasis on Nero and Spock rather than the Enterprise and Federation. This is new to Trek, as usually the emphasis would be vise versa. But in this case, it is highly appropriate, because the only characters that carry over from the Countdown to the new movie are Nero and Spock. In the end, it provides a very good background story on Nero whilst giving Trek fans there doggy treats.

82. OneBuckFilms - February 24, 2009

72 – Not really. I think the comics are in fact 15-20 years after Nemesis.

Remember, Spock is Vulcan, and Data is an android, which means they have longer lifespans than humans.

Also, we don’t quite know what Picard will be like. He could be 15-20 years older and not look all that different from Nemesis.

78 – I doubt that as the Grandfather Paradox possibility makes that problematic.

83. Captain X - February 25, 2009

hello! stardate 64390,1 that places it 20 years after TNGs 4h season in 2387-88.

spock could have been on romulus for 20 years before unification.

84. NCC-73515 - February 25, 2009

52
Microbiology deals with bacteria, protozoa and other single-cell organisms. Cnidaria are NOT part of microbiology.

85. NCC-73515 - February 25, 2009

I meant 58, Syrnath.

86. BK613 - February 25, 2009

82
The grandfather paradox is a philosophical question and not necessarily a scientific one.

87. Don Farnsworth - February 25, 2009

@20
“To your earlier comments, this comic had nothing to do with “marketing guys”. Alex Kurtzman and Bob Orci thought it might be fun to do.”

You are kidding, right? nothing to do with marketing. Yep bunch of guys have tons of caash to splash on nothing more than a bit of fun.

It’s all about marketing, these guys are not a charity, they need to see some tangible return.

It is most def about winning over fans who had reservations about the movie. It is those fans that love the clunky dialogue. The dickier the dialogue the more they feel the movie is indeed in safe hands.

@21 we know spock mentions in the comic that he has not seen Data since his demise during Nemesis because the guys at aint it cool tell us so. Worth looking at other sources sometimes.

88. Closettrekker - February 25, 2009

#38—”It’s almost as if, in my opinion, you’re saying that simply because the episodes and movies still exist for your viewing pleasure in the real world, the fictional timeline has not been eradicated.”

It looks as if you have only read one of my posts…

My argument against the notion that previously established canon is rendered irrelevant has always been that the new story depends upon that continuity for its very existence. The broader story can never advance to the point where either Nero or Nimoy’s Spock (both products of the “Prime” timeline) make the decision to travel into the past without every event depicted in all 5 television series and 10 previous films combining to form the timeline with which you and I are familiar.

The post to which you responded was in direct reply to the notion that simply because events occur in another timeline– they do not occur at all. It has nothing to do with the existence of dvd’s or network syndication, etc. Those events occurred within that fictional universe, even if within an alternate timeline.

89. Closettrekker - February 25, 2009

#62—”Methinks the writers just screwed up. Why would they confuse people by having Spock use a non-human scale of measuring “years” and not bother to explain it? If Spock had said, “My home for the last 20 years,” no one would have blinked (hard to believe, but his TNG crossover episodes happened 18 years ago!). But no, they had to say 40. No way he’s been there 40 standard years.”

The important thing to remember (IMO) is that, by conventional standards, the comic book would not be “canon” anyway. It will only be truly contradictory if it is suggested in the dialogue of the film that Spock has spent that 40 years on Romulus. I find that unlikely—just a gut feeling.

90. Spock - February 25, 2009

First of all, Data was a shmuck and I haven’t met anyone who wasn’t glad that he got the big finger in Nemesis. I was just praying that he wouldn’t take any other characters with him, because I actually like some of those guys.

Second, no one cared about him dying because he was a hard drive and he’d been backed up a few hours into a basically identical (though extremely irritating) copy.

I think Star Trek 11 should be B-4 being fed into a combine harvester, for starters. Then straight onto Riker, commanding the Titan.

91. mntrekfan - February 25, 2009

I just read the book. I won’t give away anything, but, there is an Easter Egg on page 22. I laughed out loud when i saw it!

92. BonesCLCW - February 25, 2009

Went to get the issue just now and it was sold out!!

93. Nik - February 25, 2009

Gys its data on a different timeline so its
possible he is still operational

94. Datalore - February 25, 2009

So now that it’s out, everyone knows B-4 was imprinted with Data’s neural net. I like the idea Picard is an Ambassador rather than an Admiral, which speaks to his diplomatic skills that he has ALWAYS shown during the TNG series. Also, I think it’s fitting that he is the federation ambassador to Vulcan, echoing what Spock said about his character in Unification II- “There is almost a Vulcan-like quality about the man”.

All in all, this was a much better issue than the first. Some of the dialogue seems to be back to normal Trek-speak, and we see the beginnings of evil Nero. It’s funny though; I really still can’t see the connection of Nero going back into time. I mean, yeah, he obviously comes with some misguided theory on how this is all Kirk’s fault, but isn’t EVERYTHING Kirk’s fault? If he never existed, neither would the federation, so that’s a no-brainer. I hope they come up with something that directly ties Kirk to what’s happening here… And they have two issues to do it!

95. Closettrekker - February 25, 2009

#94—I’m not sure that such a revelation prior to the part of the story depicted in the film is realistic. Wouldn’t such a tie-in make more sense within the film? They are obviously not expecting anyone but the die-hards to read these.

From what I gathered before, it was more about finding out how Spock and Nero are intertwined, and why nero descends from a Romulan miner/patriot to villainy.

96. cpelc - February 25, 2009

I just read the new issue….

Definitely starting to form some ideas on Nero’s motivations in the movie.

Anxious for the next one….looks like it might be a little more action-packed now that they’ve set things in motion with the first two issues.

97. DGill - February 25, 2009

I haven’t read issue 2 yet, but I’m extremely curious as to why Nero would want to destroy Earth and Vulcan because of this…hopefully the next two issues can shed some light on that.

98. Darklighter - February 25, 2009

A very good issue! Just a little odd that Picard doesn’t seem to have aged a day, though. ;) Are we positive that was Romulus in the final shot? It certainly appears to be, based on Nero’s reaction, but then again they merely said they’d entered “Romulan space” which seemed like odd wording.

Either way, my prediction is that Nero’s wife will have been safely evacuated on a Vulcan ship or something, but Nero won’t know this and will start firing away on the Vulcan ships in retaliation, killing her in the process and driving him even further into rage/villainy.

99. Ed - February 25, 2009

Just read issue 2 & like where it’s going. The explanation for Data is expected, wonder what Geordi’s feelings on it are. Nero does seem to be up to something wanting to mine the computer for all he can. Can’t wait for #3.

100. VOODOO - February 25, 2009

Nero’s anger with Spock and the planet Vulcan seems a little misplaced. Spock did plead with the leaders on Romulas to take action, but they refused.

Nero seems to be a little immature or at least a two dimensional thinker.

What did Kirk ever do to the Romulans that would change their future? Surely there must be a better target for Nero’s anger than Kirk?

101. Unbel1ever - February 25, 2009

Hmm, wasn’t the Vulcan High Command dissolved in Enterprise Season 4 ?

102. mntrekfan - February 25, 2009

For those who have read the book, have you found the easter egg on pg. 22?

103. cpelc - February 25, 2009

102

Are you talking about Data singing in the background?

104. garen - February 25, 2009

apparently it was not shipped to my local store today. last months issue was there right on time.

what gives….i guess i’ll check back.

105. McCoy's Gall Bladder - February 25, 2009

To the dude who said “read shit”

It’s not enough to know what, but one must understand the why

Or have you always just followed the crowd?

“I’m laughing at the superior intellect”

106. McCoy's Gall Bladder - February 25, 2009

Everyone concerned with timelines should read Ray Bradbury’s Delicate Sound of Thunder, and watch Futurama’s Roswell’s that Ends Well

107. mntrekfan - February 25, 2009

On pg. 22, Spock and Picard are talking. If you look to the right, there is a Bad Robot sitting at a terminal…

108. nephron - February 25, 2009

Ambassadors are unto Star Trek as Bounty Hunters are unto Star Wars.

109. Admiral_BlackCat - February 26, 2009

Wild Speculation:
Spock goes on a one way trip “Need of the many outweigh the need of the one” mission into the supernova star with Red Matter/decalithium. Nero is in hot pursuit as Spock succeeds in stopping further supernova destruction, but the resulting exotic particles send both Spock and Nero timetaveling into the past, circa 2233 near Kirks birth.
But why Nero attacks the Kelvin remains unknown, unless it’s vengence on Spock and all things dear to him i.e. Vulcan, Starfleet/Federation, and Kirk.
However, regardless of Spock’s intentions with stopping the supernova the result is still allowing Nero to go back in time and creating a new alternate timeline.
So again, it’s all Spocks fault!!

110. Unbel1ever - February 26, 2009

[SPOILER !]

from ST online road to 2409 update:

“Chief Engineer Geordi La Forge requests a long-term leave of absence from Starfleet to work on personal projects, including a plan to build and test his own starship designs. But his first project is to assist the team at the Soong Foundation studying the Soong-type android B-4. With his help, on Stardate 62762.91 the team unlocks what it calls the “Data matrix,” successfully accessing the personality, knowledge and memories of Data, who had downloaded this information into B-4 before his destruction in the Battle of Bassen Rift.

The Data persona asserts itself over B-4’s more primitive programming, and the android is able to assist the Soong Foundation team to upgrade the positronic brain and recreate the emotion chip invented by Dr. Noonien Soong. The team is confident that their work will be completed in months. “

111. thereare4lights - February 26, 2009

The whole story with a supernova threatening the entire universe feels incredibly st00pid. It wuz dumb from the start and it keeps getting dumber.

112. Closettrekker - February 26, 2009

#111—-STXI: The Inconvenient Truth

:)

113. nephron - February 26, 2009

#111:

How dare you call shananigans on the storyline. It’s been published, so it is official and therefore not stupid.

If you continue down this sacrilegious road, if you pursue heresy against canon, what’s next? Calling bull$!it on bumpy-headed people-as-aliens? The insultingly lame holographic-doctor-premise? The stupid-as-$h!t plotlines of well over HALF of ALL the episodes from EVERY series?

You keep that up, and maybe people will think it’s ok to regard Star Trek as mere consumer-product-entertainment & stop taking it so seriously, instead of holding the proper quasi-religious reverence for the CANON of Star Trek, like they should. They might even start reading real science fiction that’s truly well-thought out, like Frank Herbert, , Robert Reed, or Ken MacLeod. Exposure to stuff like that might even lead some to think that Gene Roddenberry wasn’t a genius.

BURN THE HERETIC!

Seriously, the supernova thing is stupid. Mind-numbingly, insultingly stupid, and it’s nice to see someone who maintains standards instead of swallowing EVERYTHING just because the Star Trek-brand label’s been slapped on it.

114. weerd1 - February 26, 2009

I’m a little confused as to why the Vulcans have a “Praetor” when the Enterprise arrives, and as 101 says, wasn’t the High Command disbanded 200 years earlier? Otherwise, decent issue though I find the number of obvious photo references throughout to be a little distracting.

115. Unbel1ever - February 26, 2009

The problem is, the story doesn’t make sense. First of all, how would Spock and only Spock of all people on Romulus see the danger of the nova ? Why would the Vulcan High Command (should be High Council) refuse something that is endorsed by the ambassador of the Federation since the “high command” would have to yield to the judgement of the Federation Council ? Even if there were security concerns, the operation could be carried out by the Enterprise without major Romulan involvement. Besides since when does the Federation value the potential threat of Romulans gaining knowledge of a “potential weapon” higher than helping prevent the destruction of an entire race and in the process gaining a chance for peace with the Romulans by helping them ?
The Vulcans are once again the Romulcans from Enterprise.

After having read what else is supposed to happen in the timeline to 2409 by the ST online guys, which seems to follow the events of the comics, I would say, this is not the prime timeline after all, but the would be timeline of “All good things”.

116. Jordan - February 26, 2009

What was the planet at the end of the comic?!

117. Unbel1ever - February 26, 2009

#116

I guess “to be continued”. The way I see it, one of three possibilites:

a)
the planet is Romulus and Nero cries, because he thinks he’s failed is wife

b)
the planet it not Romulus, but another populated planet and Nero mourns the victims of the planet

c)
Nero is a whimp, who cries because a rock that said “Romulan” was blown up

118. Sean4000 - February 26, 2009

#110,

I can sleep at night now knowing that bit of information.

*****exhales after 7 long years******

Sean

119. Locutus - February 27, 2009

I read the first two issues and i must say I was disappointed. As Don Farnsworth pointed out, much of the dialogue seems to be out of character. The Romulans are acting overly agressive for no reason, the only solution they can think of is to start an open war to Vulcan. I would expect more devious plans from them.
On the other hand, the Vulcans are much too stubborn and hostile against their “enemy”. Their actions are illogical. When they are welcoming Spock, I almost thought they were planning on arresting him for some reason, with all those armed guards which are later called by Picard as “dogs”. Picard, telling a Vulcan to “call off his dogs”?
The Romulans’ inability to determine the size of the threat, the Vulcans’ inability to understand the size of the threat, the Federation’s inability to convince Vulcans… I don’t get it. They are all watching as a great danger is threatining the universe…
In short, the story of the comicbook is one that does not make a great sense. I hope the final two issues will be better, and I really hope this is not a bad sign for the movie’s story…

120. GB - March 2, 2009

Writers seem to be pretty clueless about what a super nova is beside it being an exploding star (which they seem to have found out after 1st issue because in the 1st issue they confuse red giant with a super nova!).

121. ProudNerd - March 4, 2009

Hey. Data’s back! That alone is enough to make me consider this comic as being “canon” for me!

Y’all wouldn’t believe how frickin happy I was to find this out. I almost quite literally cried tears of joy!

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