Star Trek: The Next Generation Promotional HD Screenings To Be Held In July | TrekMovie.com
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Star Trek: The Next Generation Promotional HD Screenings To Be Held In July May 15, 2012

by Anthony Pascale , Filed under: Conventions/Events/Attractions,DVD/Blu-ray,TNG Remastered , trackback

As previously reported the first season of Star Trek: The Next Generation arrives on Blu-ray on July 24th. And in order to promote the release, CBS will be holding theatrical screenings across the USA in advance of the release. These one-day screening events are another great way to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the series. See below for more details.

 

Star Trek: TNG in HD on the Big Screen in July

CBS and Paramount Home Entertainment are planning on holding theatrical screenings for two HD remastered episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation on Monday July 23rd. The screenings will help promote the release of the first season of TNG, which comes out the next day. The news was first reported by TVShowsOnDVD and while CBS and Paramount are officially announcing anything at this time, TrekMovie has confirmed the report with our sources.


HD capture from “Where No One Has Gone Before” – headed to the big screen in July

The two first season episodes chosen for the event are  “Where No One Has Gone Before” and “Datalore.” The screenings will also show behind the scenes on the making of the remastered TNG (from the Blu-ray special features). Screenings will be held across the USA. TrekMovie will post an update when CBS makes the official announcement with pricing and theater list details.


HD Capture from “Datalore” – headed to the big screen in July

All of this is to get you ready for Star Trek: The Next Generation on Blu-ray, coming out July 24th. If you missed, TrekMovie has posted details on the set, along with a video clip and stills. The set is not yet available for pre-order in the USA. We will post an update when it shows up online.


TNG S1 box

Repeat of TOS event from 2007

This promotional screening plan is actually something that the home video team did before for the original Star Trek. Back on November 13th and 15th, 2007 there were screenings of the remastered version of “The Menagerie” (Parts 1 & 2) held at 300 theaters across the USA (and around the world) a week before the first season of Star Trek was released on HD DVD. See the trailer below.

 

 

Comments

1. J.A.G.T. - May 15, 2012

Flippin Bushwhackers!

2. MJ - May 15, 2012

You’ve got to be kidding me. Who is going to pay to see this square picture on a big screen?

3. James Cannon - Runcorn Trekkie UK - May 15, 2012

Was hoping they’d show ‘Code of Honour’…

4. Simon - May 15, 2012

“HD capture from “Where No One Has Gone Before” – headed to the big screen in July”

That’s actually from LONELY AMONG US.

5. DJT - May 15, 2012

Fo** yeah!

As long as it’s not Code of Honor.

6. Vultan - May 15, 2012

#2

What’s wrong with square? Better than pan and scan (in reverse).

7. captain_neill - May 16, 2012

2

Why are you so nasty to Next Gen? One thing I tire of on this site in the anti Next Gen comments.

Next Gen is great and can’t wait to see this on blu ray. Damn annoyed I am going to miss a big screen showing.

8. StalwartUK - May 16, 2012

You mention Canada and Europe got scrennings of The Menagerie. Any hope of us lot getting TNG on the big screen as well?

9. Skippy2k - May 16, 2012

Cool! I went to see the Menagerie remastered when they showed it on the big screen, seen it many times still kinda cool to see it in theater on the big screen. Looking forward to these too, hopefully within driving range.

10. Lords Of Kobol Book - May 16, 2012

#3 –

That’s funny.

11. Dr Beckett - May 16, 2012

@2 – I would most certainly pay to see this. As would legions of other fans.

12. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 16, 2012

2
To bad you dont have any theatres near you that have the abilitiy to bring there masking into academy aspect ratio :)

Cant wait to watch this on the big screen :)

13. Bob Tompkins - May 16, 2012

Shame the picture will be so narrow on the widescreens..

14. DJT - May 16, 2012

So we are going to see “Where no one has gone before”.

I will chuckle when Riker says, “It wasn’t him, it never was.
It was his assistant!”

15. DJT - May 16, 2012

Crazy idea. If we are going for two episodes of TNG …in a theater.

What better episodes than BOBW (parts uno AND dos).

16. Daniel Shock - May 16, 2012

yeah…honestly I wish it were Best of Both Worlds… but I understand why it’s 2 first season eps

17. Brett L. - May 16, 2012

“Datalore” and”Where no one…” are reasonable choices. It’s hard to think of more than a few season one episodes that would merit the big screen treatment. “The Arsenal of Freedom” might have been fun visually– a fun episode where you get a saucer sep, and if I recall, a first look at the ship’s phasers.

18. Damian - May 16, 2012

#2–If your literally talking about the 4:3 size of the screen, “The Menagerie” was shown the same way and the theater I went to was packed.

If your talking about your opinion of the show in general, well to each their own, but TNG did have a substantial following.

If your just talking about the choice of episodes, well I’d probably prefer seeing “The Best of Both Worlds,”"The Inner Light” or something on that order, but my guess is they’re still working on the later seasons. The two episodes they picked were probably 2 of the better episodes from season 1 (though “Conspiracy” was another highlight), however, my guess is they wanted to showcase the special effects, and the 2 episodes they picked would showcase those changes better.

19. bmar - May 16, 2012

Judging by the picture from Datalore, I think the one thing that the sparkling clear HD transfer shows us is that the A/C on the Enterprise was set way too low.

20. Christopher Roberts - May 16, 2012

It’ll look marvelous. When it comes out Blu ray, play around with the settings on your television for displaying 4:3. There’s a zoom option on my Panasonic plasma. There’s another that sets overscan to minus… pulling back from the intended frame area. Credits and captions are effected, but mostly it’s fine… for those 4:3 intolerant people.

21. Sebastian S. - May 16, 2012

I remember going to see “The Menagerie” remastered in HD at a theatre back in 2007 to celebrate it’s then-dvd release. Only problem is that the digital projection was somewhat dim and the idiot behind us kept providing a ‘running commentary’ on the whole show.

Other than all of that, it was kind of neat. If I were more of a TNG fan, I’d probably go…

22. Jeyl - May 16, 2012

Ah, yes. My dream of seeing the episode where the writers literally cemented Wesley Crusher as a mandatory bridge crew member on the big screen can finally be realized. Although I still don’t know why they didn’t go with the episode that delved into Wesley’s hidden fantasies.

Geordi: That’s the Captain’s Voice.
Wesley: It’s pieced together from words he’s used over the intercom. With this, I can pretend he’s ordering me to take the Enterprise anywhere.

He records Picard’s voice from the intercom, puts it on a sound device, and uses it to pretend that Picard is ordering Wesley around……

Wesley: I made it into a repulser beam!

You sure are one to know how to repulse things Wes.

23. Commodore Mike of the Terran Empire - May 16, 2012

They could have chosen better Eps. Like Farpoint or The Neutrial Zone and Conspiracy. Those would have been better choices.

24. George Zip - May 16, 2012

Yeah, I do love TNG but Season One is not its showcase.

25. Caesar - May 16, 2012

Yeah, stinking “square picture!” Crap like Casablanca, The WIzard of Oz, Adventures of Robin Hood–nobody paid to see that garbage on the big screen because it had a stupid “square picture!” Movies ONLY got good in 1952.

26. MvRojo - May 16, 2012

I saw “The Menagerie ” in theateres when they did that to promote the TOS remastered project. It was pretty cool seeing it on the big screen.

27. Orb of the Emissary - May 16, 2012

OMG! I can’t wait! My brother and I went to see “The Menagerie, Parts I & II” in 2007 and it was a wonderful experience!! I can’t wait!!

While I like the episodes they are going to show, and can’t wait to see them on the BIG screen, my personal picks would have been: Lonely Among Us, The Big Goodbye, 11001001 or The Neutral Zone. Just saying…

I hope they do this for all seasons of TNG prior to their respective releases! :-D

28. Red Dead Ryan - May 16, 2012

Yeah, I kind of see MJ’s point. The problem with playing Trek episodes on the big screen (minus “Enterprise”, of course) is that you’re filling up only half the screen. It’s the same reason why I doubt that we’re going to see 2.35:1 television screens. A 4:3 dvd is going to look ridiculous on it.

#7.

MJ wasn’t bashing TNG. He was making a point about the aspect ratio. So cool it!

29. AJ - May 16, 2012

‘Heart of Glory’ would be a nice option as well, though the only FX are a constantly repeated stock shot of the D7 battlecruiser.

30. Shannon Nutt - May 16, 2012

Looks like Paramount has set a MSRP of $118 for the set, which means Amazon will have it for about $75. PASS! That’s WAY too expensive per season. It’s going to have to be $50 or lower before I dive in.

31. sean - May 16, 2012

#5

I’m hoping everyone involved realized that episode is a blight that no one would want to watch again, and it would be incredibly dumb to pick it as one of the screening eps.

32. denny cranium - May 16, 2012

I’m always fascinated by people who balk at the price of things.
$75.00 for something that you can own forever.
My monthly cell phone bill exceeds $75.00
My cable bill is more than that.
When I get my hair cut its $40.00
Im my opinion $75.00 is a bargain.
Heck I rented a Starbucks lattee this morning for $5 bucks!
I’m not taking a poke at you in particular Shannon I notice people all around me claim things are too expensive . Its human nature I guess
I’d love to see TNG eps on the bigscreen btw

33. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 16, 2012

28,

showing a movie in academy aspect ratio still fills up more than half screen.
And if your watching in a theatre that is equiped with, masking that draws all the way into the academy ratio you also dont have to watch with pillar boxing of the image either.

You don’t see or here people going to screenings of classic movies like wizard of oz, Casablanca, King Kong, Gone with the Wind, Singing in The Rain etc, complaining about a “Square” image.

And fyi there are allready 2.35:1 (21:9) tvs on the market as well.
And academy aspect ratio looks fine on them.

34. Justin Olson - May 16, 2012

What are the chances that this will be shown on the high-end 2k or 4k cinema projectors and not the dim, uncalibrated consumer-grade projectors that are used to show ads before the main feature?

Is this a Fathom event? I smell trouble. How was “Menagerie” shown?

35. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 16, 2012

25 haha exactly, there are classic showing of academy aspect ratio movies around here all the time with sell out crowds, and keep in mind we are talking movie palaces that seat well over 700 ppl in a single auditorium and you never hear people complaing that its a “Square” Image .

One thing I need to make a note to you about though, while cinerama and cinemascope were introduced in 52 and 53, there were wide screen movies in theatres long before then. John Waynes first movie The Big Trail was shot in the wide screen Fox Grandure 70mm format, and there were other similar widescreen movies around 1929, and of course the finale of Napolean in 1927 was also depicted in the earliest wide screen attempt.

But the gist of your post is correct, its silly for people(most likely the same ones who wanted to fill their tv screens back when widescreen versions of movies for tv were begining to be introduced ) to think that just because a movie is shown in its academy aspect ratio format they wont want to see it.

There are thousands of great movies that were shot in academy aspect ratio, and still look just as amazing on the big screen as they did when they were first released/

36. MvRojo - May 16, 2012

#32. Although I have no problem paying $75/season, I understand the flipside. If you’re comparing prices for TV show to TV show, TNG at $118 MSRP (~$70 from most seller after discount), it is significantly higher than other TV shows, which are generally priced at $80 MSRP at most.

For example, the whole Farscape series (4 seasons – 88 eps) has an MSRP of $150. Fringe MSRP is $70/season.

I’m sure part of the reason for the higher MSRP is that this is the main revenue stream for the whole remastered project, but it is jarring for some people to pay that much.

37. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 16, 2012

34) yeah thats the thing people should be worried about, if its a fathom, NCM or Cinedyne screening than it likely would be a similar experience to the TOS screenings in a number of theatres.

38. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 16, 2012

36 Farscape is also just a upconvert of of the episodes. And looks like crap especially on bigger screens.
They didnt have all the hundreds of hours of work that TOS and TNG have had done restoring them and doing a propper HD upgrade.

39. Damian - May 16, 2012

I really don’t think you’ll notice the 4:3 aspect on a theater screen. When I went to see “The Menagerie” it was already bigger than I’ve ever seen it. I quickly forgot it was 4:3. I mean, what are you going to do about it anyway, it’s not like you can go back in time and refilm it with widescreen cameras.

28–I wasn’t exactly sure how to take MJ’s comments. Was he being literal or figurative? He’s made no secret of his disdain for Berman era Trek (except maybe DS9) and it could have been a swipe at TNG in general. Captain Neill gets very sensitive about Star Trek.

40. THX-1138 - May 16, 2012

Aspect ratio smaspect ratio. I’m there.

And for the TNG haters, you can all nibble on my BVD’s. The picture will be crystal clear and large. Here are some other movies that weren’t wide screen that you should avoid in a theater:

Casablanca
the original King Kong
Citizen Kane
Gone With the Wind
The Wizard of Oz
Shane

41. THX-1138 - May 16, 2012

Sorry danielcraig. I didn’t see your post.

42. Vultan - May 16, 2012

#40

Exactly.
Also, the best picture winner “The Artist” is in square 4:3 format.

“Sacrebleu! What are those black bars on the left and right? My peripheral vision is burning!”

43. Nemesis4909 - May 16, 2012

Why don’t they ever do these sorts of things in the UK? I’d totally go for that.

44. AJ - May 16, 2012

Heck, they should do these cinema showings year-round, just for the heck of it.

Show a double feature of “Space Seed” and TWOK, or a triple feature of those two plus “Star Trek: As Yet Untitled Star Trek Feature.”

I would jump to see BOBW on the big square screen.

Also waiting for a Trek film to be 3D-ized. That scene in the Mutara Nebula is beautiful as it is, but in glorious re-mastered 3D, I think the old bird would make a ton of money.

45. THX-1138 - May 16, 2012

That is a Paramount idea, AJ (see what I did there?). I don’t SEE any BS with that (oops I did it again).

Maybe not every theater would be filled all the time. But I would pay cash money to see remastered Doomsday Machine or Trouble With Tribbles or Balance of Terror or The Menagerie again.

Best of Both Worlds, Yesterday’s Enterprise, All Good Things, and other great TNG eps would be a kick to watch in the theater.

46. Shannon Nutt - May 16, 2012

Yes, the $75 (or more) per season as “too expensive” has to do with the price of other complete seasons on Blu-ray, and not what I think the set is “worth”. Most one hour, 20-something episode seasons on Blu-ray run about $40. Paramount wants double that for a show that hasn’t been on the air since 1987. It’s crazy, regardless of how much they paid to restore it.

47. Jon - May 16, 2012

I, too, wonder at folks who complain on the price. $75 is not chump change to most of us to be sure, but on the other hand, there was obviously a TON of work that went into this project…probably more than was done for the TOS BDs, and those were spectacular and well-worth the double-dip IMHO and in my case. :)

It would be one thing if CBS was just slapping these TNG prints out in some sort of minimalist, upconverted deal, but they did the right thing here using the original film elements despite the arduous task that they knew it would be.

I have no problem paying a little more for something that I know was worked very hard on by those involved. So many in today’s culture just seem to want everything for free or otherwise feel entitled to paying next to nothing for whatever it is that they want, but that’s not the way it works in this world.

And remember, there was a time when the TOS BDs were released…maybe month or so after the initial release date…that some outfits were offering them for as little as $40 new. So if you’re willing to wait a little, you might get an even better deal.

I feel more “taken” by the Trek/SciFi conventions these days. Used to be you paid one reasonable admission fee for access to everything, but now they charge you extra for everything (above and beyond the already-high admission fee). I pretty much stopped going to these deals many years back…but I guess people still go as the prices haven’t exactly gone down :( .

48. THX-1138 - May 16, 2012

To add to the price debate:

My problem stems from the fact that i bought TOS when it came out on VHS. Obviously DVD was the upgrade so I got that when it came out. Then they remastered the series and it was beautiful, so of course I bought that version because I just couldn’t wait for the inevitable bluray release. I didn’t buy the bluray version though, as my wife and family would probably lynch me. I DID however beg them for the full set of TNG two years ago for Christmas. I doubt very highly that they will pony up (or allow me to) for yet another TNG set. I admit that I want to watch TNG on my big TV but unless they sell some compilations I won’t be buying it any time soon. Fortunately we still have a video rental store that is VERY geek friendly and they will probably purchase the seasons as they become available and I’ll rent them.

As for conventions, I’m with you there, Jon. The last convention I went to was in Vegas a few years back. I managed to get in to the things I wanted to see by brazenly walking in like I owned the place. As a matter of fact, I didn’t pay a dime. Well, except for the dealer’s room. I couldn’t get out of there without a much lighter wallet.

49. BJB - May 16, 2012

A few years ago I went to the theater for a screening of “Pink Floyd The Wall”. I don’t remember why this was happening but I was stoked for the big screen HD presentation (the was before BluRay or HDDVD so I figured it was going to be on film).

When I got into the theater to sit down I was shocked to see the screen saver of some crappy cheap DVD player on the big screen! The whole thing was just played off of a DVD copy of The Wall!!!!

Considering the resolution it was still quite enjoyable though! So I doubt 4:3 would be a problem either.

50. Christopher Roberts - May 16, 2012

The Director’s Edition of Star Trek: The Motion Picture had a screening, and we know that wasn’t HD or Celluloid. NTSC 525 line DVD at best.

51. T'Cal - May 16, 2012

A couple years back, I took my boys and a friend to see The Menagerie in HD at a theatre in Chicago and it was well worth it. The image was square, of course, but it was sharp, clear, and bright plus the sound was excellent. I would love to see The Best of Both Worlds, Unification, Chain of Command, Redemption, All Good Things, and just about any other two-parter from TNG in HD on the big screen.

52. Xplodin_Nacelle - May 16, 2012

Anyone know if Paramount is going to rerelease any of the TOS Movies in IMAX HD (like Lucas did with Star Wars, & Cameron just did with Titanic) ???

I hope they do. I’d be first in line!!!

53. The Chad - May 16, 2012

Wil Wheaton tweeted about 3 hours ago that he just finished a two hour interview for the TNG Blu-ray. He says, “The documentary is going to be AMAZING.”

54. I Wish I Was Spock - May 16, 2012

I went to the one in 2007 3 times…it was great!

55. captain_neill - May 16, 2012

Don’t forget widescreen came into films as a gimmick to get people back to the cinema after the growing popularity of TV. It has stayed.

56. Brandt Hardin - May 16, 2012

The long-enduring debate of which Enterprise Captain would win in every fan’s epic showdown has spilled over with guts and gore. See the battle of the Zombie Captains as Kirk and Picard go head to head on the Zombie Walk of Fame at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2012/04/star-trek-zombies-from-zombie-walk-of.html

57. captain_neill - May 16, 2012

I am counting down the days till this is out, that is how excited I am about Next Gen on blu ray

58. Bob Tompkins - May 16, 2012

52- Not in a million years for movies that generally grossed under $ 100m the first time through…
Aspect ratio? All I have ever said is that if 1.85 X 1 negatives were available they should have worked from those if possible. I never claimed to have knowledge of that; I just know Universal HD airs TJ Hooker from the early 80s in that aspect, and if something as chintzy as that is available…?
The earliest Law and Order episodes from the early 90s are airing in that ratio in syndication currently and look awfully good even if they are just upconverted.
No one has ever accused Paramount/CBS of taking half- measures on a project just to make money— heh heh.

59. MvRojo - May 16, 2012

#42. It’s funny. I watched “The Artist” in theatres and I totally forgot that it was 1.33:1. I must’ve noticed it at first, but then totally forgotten about it because I was enjoying the movie.

When you’re in a big dark room, it really doesn’t matter what the aspect ratio is if you’re into the story or the movie in general. It should be engrossing enough for you to not be staring at the shape of the image.

60. Commodore Z - May 16, 2012

TNG on the big screen? Yessssss! Can’t wait! Maybe next year they’ll do “Best of Both Worlds”.

61. euphorik6 - May 16, 2012

i will totally go see these if they play anywhere nearby, though i agree that the episode selection is a little weird. makes perfect sense to me that they’re screening two first-year shows, and “where no one has gone before” is still (for my money, anyway) one of the series’ best episodes, but…”datalore” – ?!? come on. not a bad episode, but “11001001″ would have been a far better choice.

62. mars396@hotmail.com - May 16, 2012

I have gotten an email from Fathom Events:

Thank you for your email. Fathom will be showing the Star Trek event on July 23rd in select theatres nationwide. Please continue to check Fathomevents.com for details and participating theatres.

Sincerely,

Fathom

_____

63. Ned Kelly - May 16, 2012

Western Austalia please :-)

64. Ned Kelly - May 16, 2012

*Australia

65. mazzer - May 16, 2012

This is a Fathom event (like the TOS showing in 2007.) These guys show everything on the low-quality advertising projector. Don’t go to the theater thinking this is going to be a quality experience, or you’ll be disappointed.

Boycott this crud. I was SO disappointed with the TOS screening. It’s dark, blurry, and very contrasty – not a proper representation of what the Blu-ray will look like.

66. Anthony Thompson - May 16, 2012

2 and 28.

Probably lots of people. When I saw The Menagerie , the theatre was nearly sold out.

67. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 16, 2012

55 cinemascope and cinerama were introduced to get audiences back in theatres,(but definately not as a gimick)

But widescreen was introduced into select theatres in the late 20s and 30s long before televisions were the norm in peoples houses.

68. MJ - May 16, 2012

@28 “Yeah, I kind of see MJ’s point. The problem with playing Trek episodes on the big screen (minus “Enterprise”, of course) is that you’re filling up only half the screen. It’s the same reason why I doubt that we’re going to see 2.35:1 television screens. A 4:3 dvd is going to look ridiculous on it. #7.– MJ wasn’t bashing TNG. He was making a point about the aspect ratio. So cool it!”

Yea, thanks RDR. I just don’t see the point in seeing it on the big screen give the aspect ratio issues, as well as the fact that 1080P is far from the digitial film resolution you see on today’s movies on big screens (which is 4000 x 2000 pixels), so it is going to look fuzzy…which to me defeats the whole point of having TNG in HD. It is meant for HDTV in your living room.

69. MJ - May 16, 2012

@65 “This is a Fathom event (like the TOS showing in 2007.) These guys show everything on the low-quality advertising projector. Don’t go to the theater thinking this is going to be a quality experience, or you’ll be disappointed.
Boycott this crud. I was SO disappointed with the TOS screening. It’s dark, blurry, and very contrasty – not a proper representation of what the Blu-ray will look like.”

Yea, the quality by definition can’t be great since you will be seeing it at about 1/4th of the resolution that the theater’s digital projection can handle, plus you are stuck with the awkward 4×3 aspect. What is the point???

70. Salvador Nogueira - May 16, 2012

They could do us a big favor by showing 16×9 aspect ratio in at least some screens, so we could all see a bunch of cropped heads all the time (there goes Picard’s bald head!) and finally realize, once and for all, there’s no way in hell they could make TNG look entirely good in an aspect ratio other than 4×3. :-P

71. Salvador Nogueira - May 17, 2012

Now, seriously, about the aspect ratio. CBS should do as Disney, and have optional art to fill the pillars. They could, for instance, make a series of LCARS graphics just to go in there, and make it a full screen experience, without screwing the picture. Also, they could be turned off by the purists who wanted to see only the episode, without lateral distractions. Just my two cents. The remaining 80 bucks I’ll save to purchase the set… LOL

72. Bob Tompkins - May 17, 2012

70- Unless it was filmed natively in 16X9 like that expesive TJ Hooker series was..then no one is beheaded.
I liked the list of studio films that were filmed in close to 4-3 ratio; there is no other way we will see them in any other format because widescreen was reserved for the top of the feeding chain. There wasn’t much equipment and the filmstock was expensive, the filmmaker used what was available.
Apples to oranges comparison there.
I’m just saying if 16×9 existed, Paramount took the cheap way out as usual, nothing more, nothing less.

73. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 17, 2012

68 You know nothing……
when it comes to theatrical presentation, the standard for movie making for the first half century of movies was the academy aspect ratio.
Some of the all time greatest movies ever made were shot and viewed in the academy aspect ratio. those movies are still just as moving and powerful today when watching them on the big screen.
just last month movies like casablanca, snow white , singing in the rain, Dracula, the wolfman and dozens more were shown in their original academy apsect ratio as they were meant to be seen on the big screen.

want further proof that saying these shouldnt be played on the big screen cause of the aspect ratio is not as wide as flat or scope is absolutely stupid.
The best picture winner this past year the Artist shot in academy aspect ratio played to sell out crowds for months, in fact TWC brought it back to theatres just last weekend for a final run before it hits video.

And just for your info, there have been dozens of movies here in L.A. that have had their movie premieres, with the source being a bluray disc. RED CARPET MOVIE PREMIERES at places like the Graumans Chinese, The Arclight, The Fox Village, The Graumans Egyptian.and L.A. Live And the picture quality from those bluray discs look amazing. while most movies from the major studios do premiere on film or on digital downloads. there are a ever growing number of movie premieres for indie films featuring big A list hollywood stars being premiered and played on Bluray in theatres.
If they looked fuzzy then they wouldnt be having there premieres using them. Playing a bluray disc on a high quality christie or Nec dlp projector is not the same as showing a movie on crappy low end cheap projector used for pre show entertainment.

so again i repeat
MJ YOU KNOW NOTHING.

74. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 17, 2012

the red carpet world premier of Return to House on Haunted Hill was the first movie to be premiered in hollywood from a bluray several years ago. And again it looked fantastic on the screen.

last years LA Times Hero Complex, screened the double feature of Superman the directors cut and Superman II the donner cut, using the bluray as the source on a 2k christie cp 2230 projector with a 10 k lummens bulb on 65 foot screen, and it looked fantastic.

75. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 17, 2012

cont Richard Donner was in the audience for both showings as he hosted a Q&A for them and he even said it looked just as good as it did at that same movie theatre for their respective movie premieres.

76. star trackie - May 17, 2012

if the theater doent have a good DLP digital projector, the picture will suck. Scope it out before you throw down $10.

77. Damian - May 17, 2012

68–When I went to see “The Menagerie” I was there more for the experience of seeing a Star Trek episode on the big screen. I really wasn’t looking to see if it was really 1080p or not. I’ll save that for home.

I really haven’t decided if I’ll see these 2 episodes or not. They were ok episodes, probably 2 of the better episodes from season 1 (and 2 with the most special effects to show, which is why I think they were chosen). Now if this was “The Best of Both Worlds”, there would be no question my behind would be in one of those seats.

78. Damian - May 17, 2012

Or “Chain of Command.”

Seeing that on the big screen, I wouldn’t know how many lights there were.

79. MJ - May 17, 2012

@73. “68 You know nothing……
when it comes to theatrical presentation, the standard for movie making for the first half century of movies was the academy aspect ratio.”

Hey Gramps, of course I know that. And also the initial films were black and white and silents. So???

80. MJ - May 17, 2012

@75 “cont Richard Donner was in the audience for both showings as he hosted a Q&A for them and he even said it looked just as good as it did at that same movie theatre for their respective movie premieres.”

What you describe is physically impossible. The pixel resolution of “fresh” film on the original theatrical release dates would be far greater than that shown from a blu-ray. And the max resolution of a blu-ray is 1080P, so even though it was shown on a 2K projector, the best resolution was 1080P interpolated/upscaled by the projector or special blu-ray player to 2K… i.e., the native resolution was still 1080P.

And let me also point out that most digital projectors today are at 4K, which theoretically is still about half the resolution of “fresh” film. So doing the match, the blu-ray movie that these nice older folks from the Superman film watched that night, most likely had between 1/4 and 1/8 of the resolution that they would have seen at the original premiere.

I’m glad you enjoyed the experience, but I am not going to give you a free pass on changing the laws of physics here.

81. MJ - May 17, 2012

@73 “And just for your info, there have been dozens of movies here in L.A. that have had their movie premieres, with the source being a bluray disc. RED CARPET MOVIE PREMIERES at places like the Graumans Chinese, The Arclight, The Fox Village, The Graumans Egyptian.and L.A. Live And the picture quality from those bluray discs look amazing. while most movies from the major studios do premiere on film or on digital downloads. there are a ever growing number of movie premieres for indie films featuring big A list hollywood stars being premiered and played on Bluray in theatres.”

Sorry, but that is impossible for them to look “amazing”…the resolution is just not there. Does is look good enough for the artsy-fartsy indie crowed, after having a bit too much wine at the pre-dinner event, to be happy enough with the quality to enjoy the experience…sure, that will work. I mean it’s and indie art film, so people care less about the quality and more about the content.

82. Vultan - May 17, 2012

#79

So… I believe he’s saying a movie should be projected in its original shape, because that’s how the director composed it. Do we really want to go back to the days of Ted Turner colorization, pan and scan, etc.? That’s re-directing the movie (or in this case, TV show).

That’s the [shudder]… revisionist, George Lucas way.

83. MJ - May 17, 2012

@82 “So… I believe he’s saying a movie should be projected in its original shape”

Exactly. A “movie” should be projected in its original shape. And a “TV show” should be projected in both its original shape and medium…i.e. it on a TV set…and this is especially true for 4×3 TV epispodes that only have about 1/8 to 1/4 of the pixel resolution as a 4K movie projector.

84. Vultan - May 17, 2012

#83

Well, apparently many people can deal with different shape and resolution.
^See “The Menagerie” comments above. Personally, I’d go just for the sound.

Think I may skip these episodes, though. But if they show Yesterday’s Enterprise and Best of Both Worlds sometime, I’m there.

85. Red Dead Ryan - May 17, 2012

They’d be better off just connecting a PS3 to a theatre big screen and slip in the Blu Ray disc. You might get a better picture that way as opposed to trying to upconvert it to a scale that would actually make the picture blurry.

86. MJ - May 17, 2012

@85 “They’d be better off just connecting a PS3 to a theatre big screen and slip in the Blu Ray disc. You might get a better picture that way as opposed to trying to upconvert it to a scale that would actually make the picture blurry.”

Agreed. Which brings us back to full circle — i.e. it you are just going to play it from a DVD or Blu-Ray, playing it on a 50-foot screen doesn’t make good sense if you care about quality. If you are having a festival event, where the content is more important than the quality, and where the majority of the people will have a had a couple of drinks before they watch it, then it is probably OK, but be sure to sit way in the back so you can’t see the huge quarter-inch sized pixels for blu-ray and 2/3-inch sized pixels for DVD.

87. Vultan - May 17, 2012

#86

Put the ruler away and stop sitting in the front row! ;)

88. MJ - May 17, 2012

@87. LOL. Actually, your are not that far off. I like to sit only about 25% back from the front.

89. Vultan - May 17, 2012

#88

Haha. A bit too close for me. I’m a 50-75% man, depending on how crowded it is. Once I HAD to sit in the front row—last seat in the house. Man, my neck was sore afterwards. Reading the credits—back and forth, back and forth.

90. Red Dead Ryan - May 17, 2012

#87.

“Put the ruler away and stop sitting in the front row! ;)”

The front row is the best place for measurements, especially during the climax!

91. Justin Olson - May 18, 2012

#80 MJ

The question is, did the film premiere of Superman feature an answer print struck directly from the original camera negative or was it a release print. A 35mm release print is a third generation copy of the original camera negative and has about 1000 horizontal lines of resolution (this can be confirmed by filming a resolution test chart). But that’s if you examine the print itself directly. When the image is passed through the projector mechanism and lens and is looked at off the screen, the number drops to around 875 lines. Since Blu-ray has 1080 horizontal lines, it already exceeds the quality of a typical print out in the wild. Because there is no gate weave with digital, the image remains stable… and properly focused and illuminated, it should retain approximately 1000 lines of resolution.

(By contrast, a 35mm answer print would have around 1400 horizontal lines of resolution.)

If a Blu-ray is sourced from a 4K scan of the negative (or shot digitally in 4K) and isn’t processed with detail destroying digital noise reduction or edge enhancement… and it has a healthy bitrate (say 35-45Mbps), then even a $20 Blu-ray can best a 35mm release print costing thousands of dollars!

This is why I prefer digital projection (even 2K) to 35mm. If I’m going to see something on film, it has to be 5-perf 70mm at a minimum.

http://www.cst.fr/IMG/pdf/35mm_resolution_english.pdf

92. MJ - May 18, 2012

@91. That is a really cool technical paper — thanks man!

I do remember that Superman premiered in 70 mm in many theaters. So what you mention here is likely not applicable to the Superman case though. And this link would seem to confirm the availability of 5-perf 70mm prints of Superman:

http://www.in70mm.com/library/70mm_in/usa/los_angeles/index.htm

93. Justin Olson - May 18, 2012

@92 MJ

Sure thing. Though, I believe Donner was referring to the movie’s Hollywood premiere at the Mann’s Chinese on December 14th, 1978 (which is where the anniversary screening took place) and that was 35mm, I believe. I can’t remember — I was 8 months old!

The New York City premiere three days earlier at Loews Astor Plaza Theater in Manhattan was in 70mm though. And it ran there for 16 weeks apparently:

http://www.capedwonder.com/what-was-new-in-2011/

http://www.capedwonder.com/wp-content/uploads/CW-STM-Chinese-Theater-premiere-01.jpg

94. LDT - May 18, 2012

92 superman in 70mm was blown up from the original 35mm prints.

95. Justin Olson - May 18, 2012

@94 LDT

70mm blowups were struck from the original camera negative not a print, so they were first generation copies (70mm answer prints) and therefore would have preserved more of the OCN’s 2100 lines of resolution (though, admittedly, not all!).

96. MJ - May 18, 2012

Justin, what is the theoretical equivalent lines of resolution of 70 MM film that was originally shot in 70 mm…say, Lawrence of Arabia…is it 65/35 x 2100 = about 3900 lines of resolution? Which is nearly equivalent to 4K digital, right?

BTW, I would be curious on your thoughts about the new 48 FPS be using on The Hobbit 3D???

97. Captjake - May 18, 2012

I have actually worked at The Chinese for a number of years now
( though its no longer Mann, paramount and WB sold off the theatres and shut the chain down a few months back) And can verify that Superman I and II for the hero complex screenings were indeed on Blu-ray discs.

98. Justin Olson - May 18, 2012

@96 MJ

The study suggests about 185 lines per millimeter of picture height on the negative (they were shooting in the 1.85:1 aspect ratio within the Academy Aperture Area and its dimensions are 20.96 x 11.33 mm), so that would be 3877 x 2096.

The 5-perf 2.20:1 frame dimensions on 65mm negative film are 52.63 x 23.01 mm, so that would give us 9736 x 4256… nearly 10K on the negative (the “K” refers to the horizontal dimension). And 15-perf IMAX is 69.6 x 48.5 mm, so that would be 12,876 x 8972 (nearly 13K — but the image is much taller with an aspect ratio of 1.43:1).

The actual resolution might even be considered to be higher than the numbers I just cited because the 70mm image (both 5 & 15-perf) is brighter and steadier than 4-perf 35mm.

I believe the new scan of Lawrence of Arabia that we’ll soon see was done at 8K, which should pick up most of the detail on the negative from that era (1962). Remember that the finer tabular (or T-grain) film stocks in use today didn’t show up until about the mid-1980s.

***

As for 48fps… I’ll have to see it with my own eyes first before I pass any kind of definitive judgment. It will certainly solve the strobing and blur seen at 24fps*… especially in 3D — or as I like to call it, “Pop-up book cinema.” :^) Personally, I’ll be seeing “The Hobbit” in 2D first at 24fps. I don’t want the 3D and higher framerate to distract from the experience.

*Douglas Trumbull demonstrated that a higher framerate could solve those problems in the late ’70s and early ’80s with Showscan which ran at 60fps.

99. Justin Olson - May 18, 2012

Oops… ignore what I said about the resolution possibly seeming higher due to a brighter and steadier image. I forgot they were examining the negative directly. So that 185 lines formula is probably right on the money — as are the pixel dimensions I gave.

100. MJ - May 19, 2012

@98 @99. Thanks. Good to know there is someone to turn to you like you on this site when film and video tech questions come up…much appreciated!

BTW, I think Trumbull was recently trying to get investors to fund a modern digital version of Showscan.

101. MJ - May 19, 2012

You know Justin, it occurs to me that ther would likely be no technical reason why movies could use a variable frame rate…think is use in VBR in MP3 files, where teh sampling increased as needed based on the audio. For example, in a movie, you could watch the ‘people scenes’ at 24 FPS, but then when then cut to an ‘action scene’, the FPS could go up as needed…to say 36 FPS (48 might be too noticable a transition). Maybe you could do movies with the best of both worlds?

102. danielcraigsmywookiebitchnow - May 20, 2012

MJ, just as an FYI AMPAS opened up their new outdoor Theatre in Hollywood tonight, with a screening of Field of Dreams which used the Bluray disc as the source, and again it looked Great!

So please tell me where you got this nonsencial idea that movies using a BD as the source on quality commercial 2K, projectors look bad.

And this is the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences were talking about, they wouldnt present something that didnt look great.especially when there quite a few industry names at tonights opening as well.

103. Walt - May 22, 2012

Everything about this new release sounds great…except for the price tag. Seasone one – $129.99 (list) Amazon $90.99. Can we all say “Ouch”.

104. Frank169 - May 23, 2012

@ 70. I suggest you take a look at all the other Trek websites to actually see how TNG could look in 16:9. I’ve stopped counting how many Trek websites take the 4:3 HD screenshots and reformat these into 16:9 webpage illustrations without chopping off heads of the characters.
That’s really a strange product support as less informed consumers will get a wrong picture about what to expect from the upcoming Blu-ray release.

105. MJ - May 27, 2012

@102. If 1080P looks so great at your local theater. then why has your local theater spend $50,000 per theater for 4K projectors, which have 8 times the resolution of Blu-Ray. You’d have me believe that could go to Wal-Mart, buy a $99 Blu-Ray player, and the audience would be fine with that? LOL

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