Pegg: Star Trek Not A Remake

There has often been much debate about terms like remake, reboot, etc as they apply to JJ Abrams new Star Trek movie. Simon Pegg (the new Scotty for Star Trek), a self-described geek who knows the difference, addressed this issue in the latest issue of Starlog Magazine.

 

Simon Pegg, who has previously appeared on the new Doctor Who, talks about how Who relates to the new Star Trek.

The weird thing–and I think this goes for both Star Trek and Doctor Who–is that neither of them are remakes. I often see Star Trek being referred to as a remake, and it really isn’t. It’s another Star Trek film; it’s another movie in the series. It’s the continuing mission. Doctor Who is like that as well. And because of the nature of how Doctor Who evolves, you become part of that tradition rather than a re-handling of it. Both of those are perfect examples of taking the spirit of the [original material] and entirely maintaining it.

So what is it?
Pegg’s point has been backed by the filmmakers of Trek who have often said it ‘fills a gap’ in Star Trek history. However, this issue of labeling has been a sticky one for the new film. TrekMovie asked co-writer and executive producer Roberto Orci about this in a previous interview, here is the exchange:

TrekMovie.com: You guys have resisting labels for this film such as remake, reboot, etc….even prequel. Prequel has a pretty basic definition so what is wrong with calling it that?

Roberto Orci: But yet it is not entirely accurate. In some senses it is a prequel, but the word I would use, which is how Damon [Lindelof] describes it, is a re-invigoration or re-vitalization.

So there you have it. Although it is always tempting to slap a label on films to define them one way or another, the new Star Trek film may defy simple labels. 

Much more from Pegg at Starlog.com and in the current issue of Starlog Magazine.


Simon Pegg, attending a party at the Cannes Film Fest in May,
looks ready to continue the Star Trek mission (WireImage)

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