Exclusive Interview: Leonard Nimoy – Excited To Be Spock Again | TrekMovie.com
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Exclusive Interview: Leonard Nimoy – Excited To Be Spock Again July 23, 2008

by Anthony Pascale , Filed under: Interview,Nimoy,ST09 Cast,Star Trek (2009 film) , trackback

Possibly more than anything else, the inclusion of Leonard Nimoy has given Trek fans a sense of security for this new Star Trek film from JJ Abrams. In his second interview with TrekMovie.com, the once and future Spock talked about what it was like to return to the role he made famous, and also provided his thoughts on the new film (including some interesting new tidbits).

 

TrekMovie July 2008 Interview with Leonard Nimoy Part 1 – The Return of Spock

TrekMovie.com: You have witnessed multiple declarations of death of the Star Trek franchise, yet it continues to defy the critics. Why do you think it remains relevant today.

Leonard Nimoy: We are going to find out how relevant it is aren’t we? [laughs] I have high hopes that this picture will inspire a whole new generation of viewers and reinvigorate the old fans. I think the relevance always has to do with interesting characters and good stories and a positive view of mankind and hope for the future. We just saw this movie Wall-E, which is a wonderful movie and deals with excessive consumerism and neglect of the planet leading to a pretty dreadful kind of result. But even in that movie there is this one ray of hope, there is this sprig of a plant is found which informs people something can be done. I think Star Trek has always had that message, that something can be done. It has always been a vehicle where we solve problems. I think the audiences enjoy that, I think that has always been relevant. The idea that a group of people, very dedicated, very professional, and a close-knit family, set out to solve problems. I think that will always be relevant.

TrekMovie.com: You mentioned Wall-E, which has a very overt environmentalist message. Last year your film Star Trek IV was put on a top environmental films list by an environmental group, because it has a very overt environmental message. Do you feel that this new Star Trek film has any specific overt message?

Leonard Nimoy: I think it is an entirely different movie. It is more of an adventure story than a social comment movie. I would say if there is one major driving emotional force to it, it has to do with the concept of revenge and the damage that the desire for revenge can cause. And I have always been interested in that as a concern. I think that we have seen in our time, various political factions, various political leaders, various political peoples want to get revenge for what they feel has been an unjust attack and the cycle goes around and around and it doesn’t stop. Somebody has to say "lets quit this, we are just destroying each other." So I think, if anything, I come way from this movie with that concept. 

TrekMovie.com: At last years Creation Star Trek Convention in Las Vegas, you said to Bill [Shatner], and I will quote you "I have to examine where [Spock] is now, what are his thought processes? Is he more logical? Is he less logical? Is he more precise? Is he calm? Is he mellow? Has he got cranky?" So were you nervous, and was that justified? And did you answer those questions of where Spock is?

Leonard Nimoy: I was concerned stepping into a character that I have been out of for eighteen years. I was concerned as an experience, what I might find as a handle. What I might find as an entry point into the character. I really believe those concerns went away when I got on the set and started working with JJ Abrams and my fellow actors. That has always been the touch point — how is it working with the director and my fellow actors, and the script of course. If we are given opportunities and set up in such a way — the set, the directors, the cameras and so forth — that the actors and establish and successfully their relationships with each other, find their dramatic and comic moments in the scene, then everything falls away and I think that was certainly the case with this movie. I had a wonderful time and I felt totally secure in the hands of the director and the script and I worked with some terrific actors. These are very very good people. I really came way extremely pleased. I think the audience is going to find these actors really quite wonderful and they are going to be extremely well liked. I think the audience is going to take them into their hearts.

TrekMovie.com: You have now worked with four directors, in addition to yourself, on Star Trek features — [Robert] Wise, [Nicholas] Meyer, [William] Shatner and JJ [Abrams]. How do you feel that JJ’s approach differs from the previous directors, and what way does that affect your performance as Spock?

Leonard Nimoy: I think the previous directors all brought something that was valuable to the project, but none of them had the size or the scope of production to deal with that this picture offered…

TrekMovie.com: …including Robert Wise? [Star Trek: The Motion Picture]

Leonard Nimoy: Yeah, even Robert Wise. That movie, by comparison, was a less complicated film to shoot. It was sizable, there were large images, but it was not as complex in its imagery and in its story, as this one is. And I think that is a major difference. By the way, that Robert Wise picture had very little opportunity for any kind of meaningful interaction between the characters. The script was designed in such a way that it wasn’t about the characters, but about the concept and the ship. That being the case, I don’t think we had much of an opportunity as actors to bring to the screen the characters the audience found so enjoyable in the TV series. In this movie it is quite the opposite. All the character relationships are in place. The humor, which was terribly lacking in that first movie, is constantly present — a sense of fun, of adventure. And the scope and level of the production values is gigantic by comparison. …You got to believe me that I have been involved in film and television for fifty-seven years, and I have never ever involved in a production of this scale and scope. I don’t know if Star Trek IV still holds the box office record for the largest box office of these movies, but this film is going to obviously run away with that record.

TrekMovie.com: In his book "Star Trek Movie Memories," Bill Shatner talked about going from Star Trek VI to Star Trek Generations.In Generations everyone was new and everything looked different, he felt like a guest star than in his own movie. In this new movie, things look different, everyone is new, did you have a similar feeling or did you feel at home?

Leonard Nimoy: No, because I felt very much at home. Bill was dealing a set of characters and actors that were totally foreign to him. I had a quite a different experience in this movie. I was acting opposite characters, although they were being played by new actors, I was acting in scenes with characters that I recognized. I felt very much at home.

TrekMovie.com: You helped guide Kirstie Alley (Star Trek II) and Robin Curtis (Star Trek III) in their performances as Vulcans. How was it different mentoring Zachary [Quinto] when he was not just playing a Vulcan, but playing yourself, or your former and current character.

Leonard Nimoy: Well I did not direct Kirstie Alley, she was directed by Nicholas Meyer, but I did direct Robin Curtis, but the mold for that character was already set. We were breaking new ground with the pon farr scene and some other elements, but those were elements I was quite familiar with. All I can tell you is that Zachary Quinto watched enough of my work as Spock, and we spent enough time talking about the essential ingredients of the Spock character, that he was able to fly with it. I think he is going to come off wonderfully. He also happens to be an extremely intelligent and gifted actor and you can go a long way on those qualities.

TrekMovie.com: Some have noted, that with your report together, it seems as if you have adopted him as a son.

Leonard Nimoy: [laughs] That’s OK. I like that.

TrekMovie.com: You are headed to Vegas again. What are your thoughts about this year vs. last year and do fans have to look forward to

Leonard Nimoy: Last year was before we made the movie and this year is after we made the movie, so there is obviously we are in a different position. I am looking forward to meeting this audience and having an animated conversation about Star Trek and the new movie. I would certainly encourage everyone to come to this convention in Las Vegas. I think there are going to be some very interesting elements and audience pleasing.

See Leonard Live!
See Mr. Nimoy live at Creation’s upcoming Star Trek Convention in Las Vegas. The two Spocks, Nimoy and Quinto, will appear on Sunday August 10th. More info at Creationent.com.

MORE Nimoy to come
Check back later this week for Part 2 of our interview, where we talk with Mr. Nimoy about Eddie Murphy, photography, Bill Shatner and more. And if you can’t wait, read our last in depth interview with Nimoy, from Summer 2007 (Part 1 & Part 2)

 

 

Comments

1. Duncan MacLeod - July 23, 2008

Nice to see that the Timeship is already in use . Fast forward to July 2009!

Just teasin ya Anthony, We all love ya and you do a great job with this site!

2. AJ - July 23, 2008

Good man.

3. Mother Horta was exploited - July 23, 2008

Sounds Great

4. Anthony Pascale - July 23, 2008

2008 2009 it is all the same. I edited this on the way to San Diego and just published as I just got to my hotel room. I will report back later on the Trek party tonight and anything else interesting, until then…laters

5. Michelle - July 23, 2008

It’s Kirstie Alley, not Christie Alley.

6. Dan - July 23, 2008

Cool, great interview :-)

7. oztrek - July 23, 2008

Very enjoyable read… I felt comforted and assured. Leonard is such a together and knowledgeable guy. I hope Leonard continues to live longer and prosper further.

8. The Underpants Monster - July 23, 2008

Dang, could I love this man any more? Negative, Captain!

“The script was designed in such a way that it wasn’t about the characters, but about the concept and the ship.”

And yet (for this viewer, anyway) the characters were still what put the movie over in the end. Yeah, you could tell that the focal point was meant to be the ship and the FX and the V’Ger idea, but when I saw it all that stuff just highlighted the characters (well, the Triumvirate and Decker, anyway). As Robert Frost said, “dark is what brings out your light.”

“You helped guide Christie Alley”

Yes, well, Christie needed guidance to follow in her more famous sister Kirstie’s footsteps. ;-)

9. Brian - July 23, 2008

Great work as always, Anthony.

10. CanuckLou - July 23, 2008

REVENGE! A dish best served cold. And it is very cold in the deep of space.

Fascinating to say the least.

Great interview! Thanks again!!!!

…the adventure continues…

11. Commodore Redshirt - July 23, 2008

Mr. Nimoy is one smart man. He has an understanding of what made Spock (and Trek) work and why this new film will work. Every time I read another interview with him I feel better about this project.

12. Chris H. - July 23, 2008

OK, now how about a freakin’ trailer already, JJ? :)

13. Dom - July 23, 2008

Great interview. How a true fan of Star Trek can fail to be buzzing after reading that, I don’t know!

So there’s a big revenge issue in this film. So is that Spock who wants revenge or Nero? :)

The first Star Trek film since 1991! Wow! I wonder what my 17-year-old self would have made of all the hoopla about this new film!

14. Anthony Pascale - July 23, 2008

Kirstie it is…jeez

RE: 12
OK i have finally had enough of it. I now consider all the ‘show us the ship’ etc. only comments in every thread, trolling. It is growing tiresome

now I am off…bye

15. Einstein Jones - July 23, 2008

Spock rocks. Nimoy’s a joy.

16. AJ - July 23, 2008

Mr. Nimoy seems to have revealed the theme of the film, the “price of revenge,” as it were.

From what we’ve heard, we do get to see the Big E as an alternate timeline battleship, so we will see it on a grand scale.

17. Walker - July 23, 2008

Curious about that bit re: Nimoy-Spock “acting in scenes with characters that [he] recognized.” If he’s playing opposite Pine-Kirk, Urban-McCoy et al, are we to expect a little time-travel action in the works?

18. WOWTREKWARSNUT - July 23, 2008

I knew it I knew itttttt NERO wants revenge on the vulcans and the fedration for stopping them on there conquest for domination of the galaxy . Enough is enough says spock and goes back in time to fix all of this but he hires the two guys from men in black and use that stick thing that makes young enterprise crew members forget everything that ever happened and theffore spock fixing the time line

19. The Underpants Monster - July 23, 2008

#10 – “In space, all wars are cold!”

20. The Underpants Monster - July 23, 2008

Anthony – sorry if I overstepped; this is your house, after all. I’m a proofer by day, and sometimes it’s hard to turn that part of the brain off.

21. Quatlo - July 23, 2008

Good stuff, thanks LN & AP.

22. FitzTrek - July 23, 2008

“In space, all warriors are cold warriors.” Referring to the end of the Cold War in 1990-1991, during the filming and release of Star Trek VI

23. FitzTrek - July 23, 2008

I worry a little bit about this news of revenge. It seems very close to Wrath of Khan. I worry that this movie franchise is always trying to get back to that movie.

That’s (one of the MANY reasons) Nemesis was so awful. Trek II ripoff.

But I have hope!!!! :)

24. British Naval Dude - July 23, 2008

Tha’ biggest Spock adventure yet… scale and scope bigger than tha’ white whale… or tha’ humpbacked one as well…

and thanke ta’ Nimoy…

25. British Naval Dude - July 23, 2008

Makes wondrous poetic sense fur him ta’ be tha’ longest runnin o’ tha’ original actors as characters…

and then… O Brave New World, wit’ such people in it… no mortal can fight tha’ future- embrace it, make it, and send bonny BND some bail money so he partake in it wit’ ye’….

Oh, and revenge be farrrrrr bad…

Arrrrrrrrr…

26. Tim Handrahan - July 23, 2008

How about a photo of Nimoy as Spock from this film?

27. capt Mike - July 23, 2008

Ok Spock has spoke. So all the doom sayers that this will be bad can please be quiet.As MR. Nimoy himself said this will be a grand scale movie with a great story with great action and humer. Get all that and mix it all up and you have one hell of a movie. Aka Batman the Dark Knight. So lets Warp around the sun and time warp to next year and see the movie and maybe even save the whales George and Gracie. We are in for one hell of a ride next year. Khan!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

28. Cyberghost - July 23, 2008

great stuff, can’t wait for the next part.

When Mr. Nimoy speaks like this on a project like this, you can take it to the bank.

Where can I fnd Mr Nimoys 70′s show “In search if” I think that’s what it was called. I wonder what he thinks of his non trek shows like that one. If you are old enough to remember it, it wasn’t to bad.

Anyone remember that one?

29. Commodore Lurker - July 23, 2008

24 BND:
White Whale! You’re not hunting me are you BND? Got …to…swim…faster!

30. Commodore Lurker - July 23, 2008

Kudos on the interview coup Anthony, well done!

31. British Naval Dude - July 23, 2008

When he hosted Ancient Mysteries, he was grand… forgot completely that he wuz Mr. Spock durin’ his intros…

Until that episode where they dug inta’ tha’ mystery o’ “what mysterious force stopped this one woman from allowing Hitler to overrun the world… was it visitors from the future, was it a cosmic accident resolved, or was it just a car?”

Arrrrrr…

32. Marvin the Martian - July 23, 2008

“In Search Of…” Bigfoot gave me nightmares when I was a kid.

33. British Naval Dude - July 23, 2008

30. Arrrrrr… watch yer flank at all times, matey…

34. AJ - July 23, 2008

23:

I think Wrath of Khan did the revenge theme, and did it well. Good Trek has included revenge stories, and the writers have cited TWOK as a key influence. TWOK is 26 years old, and to say XI could be a re-has, is far-fetched.

Nemesis is hard to peg as a revenge story as their is no history between Picard and Shinzon. It’s more jealousy, anger, and the lust for power. Shinzon gets his revenge against the Romulans, for sure, and then seeks to survive via a process which requires Picard to die.

Nemesis is a rip-off primarily due to the doomsday device theme, and the two-ships-in-battle stuff. But, I wouldn’t peg it as a revenge story.

35. Martin Lightband - July 23, 2008

Very interesting interveiw,, I cant wait for part 2

36. Father Rob - July 23, 2008

I don’t know… I suppose I’m just a bit slow, but sitting here and reading this interview just jarred in my the fact that Nimoy has been with Trek since the film began to roll in ’64. If I remember right, he has the very first spoken words in Star Trek: “Check the circuit.”

I find it absolutely amazing that with the rebirth of Star Trek immanent, he’s going to be there… and hopefully uttering the first words of the new human (and Vulcan!) adventure.

I did find his statements about TMP to be very interesting. There is a small subset of fans that felt that only TMP was faithful to TOS. I find it interesting that Nimoy feels that TMP was more about (and I am paraphrasing here) the Gee-Bang effect of seeing the ship. It helps put my thoughts into perspective about how to approach this film. Sure, I’d love to see pictures of this, that, and the other now (I am an impatient little man when it comes to my Trek), but the real story isn’t how many points on the turbine of the Enterprise, or if the chest insignia is metal or fabric… the real story is that we get to go back and experience the birth of a legendary crew on their first mission(s) together.

That’s priceless, and I am absolutely delighted that Leonard Nimoy will be there for it!

Rob+

37. krikzil - July 23, 2008

“I would certainly encourage everyone to come to this convention in Las Vegas. I think there are going to be some very interesting elements and audience pleasing.”

Am I there yet? I can’t wait to see these “elements’!!!

IN SEARCH OF… I remember that show. Watched it specifically for Nimoy.

38. SPB - July 23, 2008

“By the way, that Robert Wise picture had very little opportunity for any kind of meaningful interaction between the characters. The script was designed in such a way that it wasn’t about the characters, but about the concept and the ship. That being the case, I don’t think we had much of an opportunity as actors to bring to the screen the characters the audience found so enjoyable in the TV series. In this movie it is quite the opposite. All the character relationships are in place. The humor, which was terribly lacking in that first movie, is constantly present — a sense of fun, of adventure. And the scope and level of the production values is gigantic by comparison. …You got to believe me that I have been involved in film and television for fifty-seven years, and I have never ever involved in a production of this scale and scope.”

These statements, coming from Leonard Nimoy, have me more excited and thrilled for STAR TREK XI than any pic of the new Enterprise or photos of the cast could accomplish. With Nimoy’s blessing and thoughful words, I can’t say I’m nervous in the least.

CAN’T WAIT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

39. capt mike - July 23, 2008

Khan!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ok. Lets time warp to next year and brake the temperal prime directive. I just can’t wait!. At least show us a trailer. A photo of the Enterprise!. Something!!!. Khan!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

40. capt mike - July 23, 2008

Spock. How about some Cowboy daplomacy. get J.J to show some pics and or a Trailer ok. Please. We need more. Must have it soon. Ok. Im going nuts here. Im so looking forward to the new movie. But I guess we will havt to wait. Any way. That was a great interview and would lobve to read part 2.

41. Andy Patterson - July 23, 2008

“I have high hopes that this picture will inspire a whole new generation of viewers and reinvigorate the old fans. ”

It’s always been relevant and reinvigorated to me. I look forward to the movie, yes, but it’s still the same to me, part of my life, regardless.

Good interview by the way. What a cool experience to have. You go Anthony.

42. LodownX - July 23, 2008

Great job Anthony… Thanks.

43. Harry Ballz - July 23, 2008

Revenge, eh?

Sounds like it’s going to be the bastard son of Spock and the Romulan Commander, going back in time to stir up some s***!

44. Out There - July 23, 2008

Nero got picked last to play kickball on the playground in the fifth grade, and boy does he want REVENGE!

45. Tony Whitehead - July 23, 2008

16. I don’t recall the Enterprise being confirmed as an alternate timeline battleship. Did I miss something? or is this just what’s been guessed at on the boards?
Anthony, it was great to hear from Mr. Nimoy. This interview reminds me about the kid that he invited to the premiere and that you had as a cub correspondent. Any chance he’ll be back to give the young Trekker’s point of view? I sure enjoyed those articles.
Great interview, looking forward to pt 2

46. Rainbucket - July 23, 2008

Undiscovered Country also had revenge in the subtext, with old warriors who can’t let go of old battles when change is needed.

I agree that revenge didn’t figure much into Nemesis, at least in any sensible way, though it’s hard to make sense of Shinzon altogether.

There’s some very good science fiction these days, but nothing with Trek’s promise of a proud and exciting future for humanity warts and all. Maybe this movie is just in time, maybe we need that back.

47. Closettrekker - July 23, 2008

#43—Hell yeah!

48. FitzTrek - July 23, 2008

Hi Guys,

So let me rephrase. I think Nemesis’ Schinzon was a Khan-like character, with a Khan-like personal beef with the Captain. There’s the whole “echo over the voice” comment. It may have not been visible because of the extreme crappiness of the movie, but there’s no doubt in my mind that they were trying Wrath of Khan: The Next Generation.

Plus, there’s Data taking one fore the team, as Spock did.

I would definitely say there was some Revenge, even if it was poorly played out.

49. krikzil - July 23, 2008

Nemesis is the only Trek movie I haven’t seen. You’ve made me curious and I just may have to break the embargo and rent it this weekend.

50. Out There - July 23, 2008

OK, but what I really want to know is:

How’s come Leonard Nimoy isn’t posing in the same kind of outfit and pose as Jolene Blaylock did in the previous article?

51. AJ - July 23, 2008

43:

Harry, I posted that idea in the “ear” thread ages before you mentioned it…

Are you saying we think alike?

52. Beam Me Up - July 23, 2008

I heard Nimoy’s gonna write a book called “I am not Zachary Quinto”

53. SD - July 23, 2008

Happy happy happy.

(That’s all I manage so early in the morning.)

Is it May 2009 yet?!

54. Buzz Cagney - July 23, 2008

Great interview, Trekmovie guys. Thanks.
Amazing to think that we will be seeing Mr Nimoy playing Spock again after all these years. It gives me goosebumps! lol

55. Admiral - July 23, 2008

It always pains me when people talk about Star Trek primarily resonates because of its message… but that’s not really it. It’s icing. It’s awesome to have in some powerful episodes, but what keeps us coming back is the chemistry, the passion, and the actors themselves, including Leonard Nimoy.

56. Harry Ballz - July 23, 2008

AJ

the fact that we think alike is no surprise to me whatsoever!

57. Janice - July 23, 2008

Anthony, you asked very good questions, and Mr. Nimoy gave excellent answers. Kudos to you both!

58. Beam Me Up - July 23, 2008

Mr. Nimoy has always been a classy dude. May he live long and prosper!

59. krikzil - July 23, 2008

Admiral#55 — totally agree. The Chemistry is what made me a TOS fan.

60. warptrek - July 23, 2008

Mr. Nimoy, (whom I greatly respect and admire) seems to forget that from the perspective of the fans, the Enterprise IS also a major character.
In TMP this lovely lady was completely refit and redesigned and the end result was simply breathtaking.
Now I would agree that showing the new ship or the ‘concept’ as a whole shouldn’t be a mutually exclusive principle at the expense of the characters taking a backseat to the rest of the film, I would disagree that TMP was one of the worst films of the bunch. Would I have wished for more character interaction? Sure, no film is perfect but TMP stands out more as a pure adventure and exploration film and far more cerebral while all the rest have very action oriented central themes and less scientific message. If anything, TMP is actually closer to the original vision of Star Trek than any other film.

61. Captain Archer - July 23, 2008

He seems very excited every time he talks about the new film. And his excitment, makes me very excited as well. I just hope this fim goes as well as everyone hopes.

62. Trek Sister - July 23, 2008

Has anyone considered that our friend Leonard is just trying to sell a movie? After all, he has to make a buck too!

63. Tango - July 23, 2008

48.

The comparason of the two movies has been made before, and it was the first thing I thought of after seeing the two movies.

64. Tango - July 23, 2008

Good Interview. Some people start successful websites and get to mingle with legendary actors all day. Others just go to a crappy job and have to live vicariously through them.

I have to say, the best feeling in life is anticipation. When this movie comes out, good or bad, I will miss the anticipation.

65. AJ - July 23, 2008

56:

Harry:

Nor to me!

Once Subcommander Tal was outfoxed, and the Commander was left in her dinner dress aboard the E, I am sure she found the time to fit Spock in to her tight schedule.

66. JustBob - July 23, 2008

Mr. Nimoy: “I was acting opposite characters, although they were being played by new actors, I was acting in scenes with characters that I recognized. I felt very much at home.”

That’s all I need to know. I can now relax.

Anthony, well done and a “high five” to you!

67. Father Rob - July 23, 2008

64: “I have to say, the best feeling in life is anticipation. When this movie comes out, good or bad, I will miss the anticipation.”

You know, I almost agree with you. I come to this site daily (and have since its launch, save for two or three days when I was out of the country and didn’t have internet access) for my Trek fix. I used to get my fix at TrekToday, but TM is now my main home (though I recently got back to the boards at TrekBBS). Anyway, the point I am making is that I am always here looking for a new scrap of info on the coming flick… and I have tried to think about what it will be like on May 15th, 2009. By that time we will have heard what all the reviewers have to say about it, we will have heard all the soundbytes, etc…

What will we have to look forward to.

And I have two words for you.

THE SEQUEL!

Rob+

68. NotBob - July 23, 2008

This was a good interview.

But maybe it’s because it’s reassuring in some ways. J.J. Abrams keeps everthing close to the vest and I get it. He wants us to see it all for the first time and be surprised. Kind of like the holidays and not peaking at the gifts. But there is that tree, the songs, shows, etc that get me excited for the presents. And as I get older the presents aren’t as fun and important as the feeling of the season. So, when we don’t get the movie equivalent of the tree, songs, etc for the movie (what the actors sound like, what the uniforms look like, what the Enterprise looks like, i.e. the feel of the film–I get a little worried that it’s gonna be bad. Because the playing it close is similar to someone just saying “Christmas time is three weeks from now, and I have all the decorations and stuff. But you can’t see them until Christmas day. But trust me they are amazing. And funny.”

Nimoy’s interview however, calms me somewhat. While I haven’t seen the movie’s decorations, Nimoy somehow describes the things in a way that’s like, “I was part of you Christmas years ago and it will be good once again. But the fat man in the red suit will be played by someone who is really talented.”

I still want to know what’s the new Santa look like. Is his sled the same. Can I see a pick. Will the new Dasher remind me of the old Dasher. Will Uncle Leroy have too much to drink and curse out Aunt Polly? Will it be a cheesy attempt at giving me the old Christmases of my childhood? And did the Gorn get some cough medicine? And Pike? What of the new Pike? I can’t see him in the Jeff Hunter mold. Is he like the Pike I knew of yesteryear?
Happy Hanukkah

69. Book! - July 24, 2008

What about his son Adam Nimoy’s forthcoming book? Any thoughts from Leonard?

70. Denise de Arman - July 24, 2008

Ah, Leonardo, Come, sit thee down upon this flow’ry bed,
While I thy amiable cheeks do coy,
And stick musk-roses in thy sleek smooth head,
And kiss thy fair large ears, my gentle joy…

71. Sean4000 - July 24, 2008

Leonard Nimoy’s return as Spock is THE number 1 reason I am seeing this movie!

72. captain_neill - July 24, 2008

A great interview, his comments are always interesting and intelligent.

I am so glad Nimoy is back in this film. I really hope that Leoanrd has a sizable chunk of screen time in the film. I am looking forward to seeing Quinto as Spock but I am really excited about the return of Spock himself, Leonard Nimoy.

I am so glad Quinto has done his homework on Spock. I have to admit Quinto looks good as Spock.

73. e2 - July 24, 2008

shinzon reminded me very much of wat many people thought britney spears was like back in ’01 and ’02—a poor imitation of a legend…

shinzons like the columbine killers—outcasts, socially oppressed who then decide(s) to kill the oppressors only to look like a complete jackass

74. Jay - "The Real Jim Kirk" - July 24, 2008

I completely agree that the word “Revenge” does make me think of ST:TWOK, however, There is always going to be some kind of revenge in everything that we do, and revenge stories make for some good TV/Film. I just hope that this movie doesnt do a Nemesis and try and rip TWOK scene by scene.

I did enjoy the concept of Shinzon being a Picard clone, it was fascinating and not something that was completely absurd as one can imagine the Romulans going to such extremes to undermine Starfleet. I believe that Nero could be, as many people stipulated in the previous thread Spocks lovechild with the Romulan Commander, who seeks revenge on his father for abandoning him and being an enemy of his people (Romulans). He and other members of his renegade neo-nazi style romulan cult hatch a plan to go back in time and kill young spock (or cripple the federation). Spock, whilst residing on Romulus hears about this Nero going back in time and follows him back to warn his past self and the gang… blah blah blah the film goes on… possibility eh?

75. Captain Hackett - July 24, 2008

Excellent interview! I am looking forward to read second part of the interview!

Keep up great work, Anthony! :)

76. Black Fire - July 24, 2008

# 69 My guess is that Leonard will have to start answering questions about the book soon enough.

Adam recounts a conversation in his book he’s had on the subject:

“I thought after he read the thing, he was going to come after me with a sledgehammer.”

“So how did he react?”

“He called me to say he had no problem with anything I’d written. I couldn’t believe it. He had nothing negative at all. He even complimented me on the writing. I mean, my dad’s got about fifteen years of sobriety but he’s never made an amends to me (…)”

Adam’s friend concludes that his being okay with the book was Nimoy senior’s way of making amends and Adam agrees. From reading the book I guess they’ll never be best friends, but that they’ve found a way to be okay with the way things are.

My advice, read the book before you believe anything that you read about it. The same advice that could have spared Leonard a lot of grieve if anyone had actually read “I’m Not Spock” before forming an opinion about it.

77. ByGeorge - July 24, 2008

I just hope that this movie does not rely on knowing the “history” of Star Trek too much. I hope the newcomers. that they wish to attract to ST, do not need a lengthy explanation as to what is going in the plot or characters to enjoy it.

TOS excelled in part because its episodes were “stand alone”. You didn’t have to watch any previous episodes or the previous season to enjoy it or understand it. Of course the more episodes you watched, the more you came to love and understand the characters and the mission, but you could start watching it at any point during the 3 seasons and get involved without a lengthy explanation.

Later Trek became to involved in a huge fantasy universe full of too many aliens, too many characters and too many complex intertwined relationships between them that it took lots of the fun out of it for the newcomer.

A reboot back to the TOS era without all the baggage appeals to me more and more.

78. Black Fire - July 24, 2008

That is grief not grieve.

79. captain_neill - July 24, 2008

Undiscovered Country is more about our fears of the future, how things are changing and we don’t want them to change so we maintain the status quo out of fear and hating the enemy for so long that it is hard to think of peace with enemy. That is what I loved about Star Trek VI.

Guess it is also reflective of how many fans are feeling towards the recast of the new movie.

80. ss - July 24, 2008

Is anyone else getting the impression that this is going to be a 9/11 and/or Iraq war movie? Cycle of revenge, etc….

81. captain_neill - July 24, 2008

By George

Amen to getting new fans. I hope the new fans will watch the old episodes rather than thinking JJ is the sole proprietor of Star Trek.

82. Harry Ballz - July 24, 2008

#65

AJ

Schedule? That’s a funny nickname!

83. Chandler Bing - July 24, 2008

Could Nimoy BE anymore likeable?

84. star trackie - July 24, 2008

Good interview. Nimoy’s continued support of the film is the ultimate stamp of approval.

“The humor, which was terribly lacking in that first movie, is constantly present — a sense of fun, of adventure. ”

Fun and adventure. Boy is that long overdue. Can’t wait!.

85. Joey - July 24, 2008

Well, he could go commando in his velour uniform. How YOU prosperin’?

86. Duane - July 24, 2008

“Leonard Nimoy: I think it is an entirely different movie. It is more of an adventure story than a social comment movie.”

That comment scares me a bit, and the revenge story has been done to death.

87. Duane - July 24, 2008

“Leonard Nimoy: I think it is an entirely different movie. It is more of an adventure story than a social comment movie.”

That comment scares me a bit, and the revenge story has been done to death, although it is certainly relevant.

88. ByGeorge - July 24, 2008

Another boring social commentary would scare me off more than an entertaining adventure. As Shatner says — we did ST because it was FUN. Quit the “in your face” social commentaries. I watch ST to escape from somebodies political and social commentaries not to get more. ST can offer great philosophies because of a good story line. Instead we seem to be getting somebodies social commentary disguised as a story. Usually the best, more exciting, and thought provoking stories were just that — stories in a futuristic setting which had a scientific basis.

89. ByGeorge - July 24, 2008

#81

If I want to introduce my kids to ST I don’t want to have to explain to them hours worth of history and off the wall characters to pique their interest. They would become bored too quickly. It can’t be so complex or over the top that you lose them after 5 minutes, or they think it is just too ridiculous.

90. Horatio - July 24, 2008

#52 – I heard Nimoy’s gonna write a book called “I am not Zachary Quinto”

LOL! Pepsi up my nose and spewed onto my keyboard at work,. Thanks!

91. Norman - July 24, 2008

I Grock Spock.

I Grock HARRY MUDD!!!!

92. Horatio - July 24, 2008

#60 (and all TMP enthusiasts)

TMP has been crucified since its release for its lack of warmth or comic moments (which Nimoy touches on above in the interview). It does have its moments with Shatner/Nimoy/Kelly but the rest of the cast pretty much did just stare at the view screen.

Thats not saying that TMP isn’t still a good movie. The Directors Edition went a LOOOOOOOOOONG way to fixing up some of the original problems. There was significant character development for Spock and Kirk in the film (specifically Spock). In fact one could argue that Spock is the central figure of the film with his search for meaning in the universe mirroring V’ger’s. Its still one of my favorite Trek films even after all of these years.

93. Norman - July 24, 2008

ps – i know there is not supposed to be a ‘c’ in grok – but i prefer this spelling – to pay hommage to SpoCk

94. Mike T. - July 24, 2008

Revenge? That’s funny. Kirk is dead so the only way to get direct revenge on him is to go back in time, kind of like the klingon in the DS9 episoded with the Tribbles when they went back in time to the K-7 station.

There must be a line half way around the galaxy with beings (human, alien, gods, etc.) wanting revenge on Kirk.

95. AJ - July 24, 2008

Nero as Spock’s son would also make sense as the film seems to be into the theme of family.

ByGeorge: Trek succeeds when the social commentary is interwoven successfully into a good story. For example, ST4 was a great film, but probably the preachiest bit of Trek ever.

Trek’s opening monologue is all about mankind’s ultimate adventure in a universe of infinite possibilities and leaving petty differences behind. Tough to avoid social commentary there.

96. AJ - July 24, 2008

94:

I would venture a guess that Nero wants to have revenge on Spock. Spock seems to be the central character in the film.

97. Scott - July 24, 2008

Gee, Leonard — some of us haven’t seen Wall-E, yet! Way to spoil it! ;-)

Leonard is great. I love that guy. Who doesn’t?

So we have a time traveling revenge story! The main two drivers of the good Star Trek films! We’re all set!

I’m sure it’ll be fun.

Scott B. out.

98. Johnny Ice - July 24, 2008

(Possibly more than anything else, the inclusion of Leonard Nimoy has given Trek fans a sense of security for this new Star Trek film )

Not me, actually it is rather disappointing that Abrams&co didn’t have backbone to start fresh with new actors only. I don’t see the point having old Nimoy in this movie expect some fan-boyish dream from Orci/ Kurtz and Abrams working with Nimoy. .

99. AJ - July 24, 2008

98:

Ah, and what a wonderful fan-boyish dream it is.

100. Norman - July 24, 2008

Johhny has obviously found a way to sneak access to the internet from Bellevue…

101. The Underpants Monster - July 24, 2008

#95 – Agreed; the commentary works best when you don’t even realize it was there until tne end.

102. Iowagirl - July 24, 2008

I respectfully have to disagree with Nimoy regarding TMP. The film is showing a new beginning for our heroes after those years of reorientation. The old friendship has to be refastened, and this process is trying and sometimes awkward. So, it’s absolutely comprehensible and even imperative that the character relationships are “out of place” for the film’s beginning and that TMP has a rather different feel from TOS. This process is being reflected in V’Ger’s story and in the narrative pace. But in the course of the story when Kirk & Co. team up with each other again, when the friendship is reaffirmed and hits it’s peak in that very touching Kirk-Spock moment (..is there nothing more..), the viewer feels associated with the characters once more. So, I think there’s a lot of wonderful character interaction; but as it is a development story, the characters and their interaction, their development is shown from a different angle.

And don’t tell me, there’s no humor in that film…

“Wrong, Mr. Chekov. There are casualties. My wits. As in “frightened out of,” captain, sir!!

“Spock, you haven’t changed a bit. You’re just as warm and sociable as ever.”

Nevertheless, it’s always a pleasure to read what Nimoy has to say about Mr. Spock. At least, he knows whom he’s talking about. :)

103. Johnny Ice - July 24, 2008

TrekMovie.com: …including Robert Wise?
That is a low blow Anthony! TMP was probably most realistic depiction of Roddenberry vision of all the movies. Wise did a great job.

Nimoy; I don’t know if Star Trek IV still holds the box office record for the largest box office of these movies.

It doesn’t Nimoy. According to box office records add inflation into the numbers it is clear that Star Trek: The Motion Picture is the record holder and The Voyage Home is second.

104. Joe Schmoe - July 24, 2008

In the TNG episode “Sarek,” in the opening tease Picard has a throw-away line that he only meant Sarek once, at his son’s wedding.

Later in the episode, when Picard has Sarek’s mind inside him, Sarek laments his love for his wives and Spock. He doesn’t mention another son. This would suggest that Picard was at Spock’s wedding, but I guess there could be a way around this scenario.

In “Unification,” Spock gives Picard a nasty reception (by Vulcan standards), and it doesn’t seem like he has ever met Picard. Also, there is no mention of Spock leaving behind any sort of wife when he went on his mission to Romulus.

So the point being, there is some room in there where Nero could be Spock’s son. But there’s a whole lot of Swiss cheese holes in the continuity based on various lines of dialog on TNG, in regards to the back story to Spock between TOS and TNG.

I don’t think the writers of this movie will care too much about those details. If they can make Nero have a personal back story with Spock, they’ll make up whatever fits their story.

It would be a nice tie-in to the dangling plot element of Spock being left on Romulus, if Nero wants to exact revenge on Spock for something involved in the unificiation underground. I doubt the casual fan would get it or care, but it would make sense to the fans who pay attention to such things.

105. Closettrekker - July 24, 2008

#51—I too have been touting that idea since I first heard that Nero was a time-travelling Romulan and that the story was somewhat Spock-centric.

I don’t think that it the backstory, but I would love it if it was.

#98—In order to resurrect the franchise, Star Trek is going back to its roots. The TNG-era never produced such cultural/cult icons as Captain Kirk, Spock, Bones, Scotty, etc. Why not reintroduce them to a new generation? What else could justify such a first class budget? Why not make use of these wonderful characters who were never equaled in any subsequent Trek production?

Disappointed? Wow.

How can you not see the point of involving Nimoy in the film? It is the perfect way to tie in Star Trek’s beginning with where it leaves off in the late 24th Century. To me, it makes all the sense in the World.

It is not about a lack of backbone, but rather the presence of wisdom in making a new Star Trek film for this generation and beyond.

If this were a Star Trek movie about anyone besides Kirk/Spock/McCoy and co., then I would approach it just like I did all of the TNG movies—-I wouldn’t pay money to see it!!!

106. Closettrekker - July 24, 2008

#104—We are suggesting that Nero could be the “illegitimate” son of Spock and the Romulan Commander in “The Enterprise Incident”(“love child”, if you will). That would certainly give him an axe to grind! Since she was undoubtedly returned to the RSE after TEI, why would Spock even be aware of his existence?
It wouldn’t have anything to do with Spock being married or not (although in some of the novels, he does marry Saavik).

107. sean - July 24, 2008

#104

Why couldn’t Spock’s wife have simply died? There’s a lot of wiggle room in those throwaway lines in TNG. And just because Spock didn’t indicate a great deal of knowledge about Picard doesn’t mean he didnt meet him once in his life.

Of course, the real reason Sarek didn’t mention Sybok is that even without his emotional control, he’d still be far too embarassed to claim a family connection! ;)

108. Norman - July 24, 2008

Johnny – better hide… the white coats are coming…

109. Mike - July 24, 2008

I continue to go hot and cold with every piece of news about the movie. Along with the overdone, overused time travel theme, and the confusing alternate time line conundrums (remember BACK TO THE FUTURE 2, used this same multi time line BS and is considered the least favorite of that movie series), now we are getting another revenge sub plot. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Not feeling too happy today with the beginning rumblings the new X-File movie, released tomorrow, isn’t very good. A TV producer, writer (Chris Carter) turned direction handled the reins of a major film. Remind anyone of another movie franchise?

110. Anthony Pascale - July 24, 2008

Johny Ice I suggest you calm down

And if you read the context correctly you would see that I was actually defending TMP by bringing it up as the last large epic, big budget Trek film and asking him to contrast this one with that one.

By the way I did actually tell Nimoy later that TMP did technically do more biz than STIV after adjusting for inflation, but of course he pointed out (which is correct) that TMP cost twice as much. Which is the real point, just ask any Paramount exec from the era which film they considered a bigger success.

111. » Blog Archive » Nimoy Explores Treks Relevance - July 24, 2008

[...] can read the full version of this interview with Leonard Nimoy here at [...]

112. Closettrekker - July 24, 2008

#109—I think you are assuming that too much about this is unoriginal. We have never seen an origin story about Kirk, Spock, McCoy, etc. Romulan villains are not exactly “overdone”, and thus far, actual time travel only takes place in 2 of the previous 10 films (and in only 1 of the original 6).

Furthermore, even if your concerns about X-Files are justified, what does one former TV guy’s flop have to do with JJ Abrams? They are certainly not the same person. Is it based solely upon the fact that both individuals have done both television and film? That is a pretty thin thread, my friend.

And what is confusing about the timeline situation? If someone changes the past, then the timeline is altered from that point. It is not confusing to me at all.

Even in TAS “Yesteryear”, when Spock finds out that he is “supposed” to go back in time and disguise himself as Selek, aren’t we really talking about an altered timeline? An unaltered timeline would have resulted in Thelin becoming the Enterprise First Officer, and Spock dying at a very young age. It all seems very simple to me.

I don’t see anything so far to be pessimistic about…

113. AJ - July 24, 2008

It’s interesting to hear Leonard’s reaction to TMP as he had to play Spock cold and logical instead of as he should be. He wasn’t asked “where should Spock be?” in personal his development at the time of TMP. Perhaps that stick’s in Nimoy’s mind when he recollects the experience of TMP.

It will be interesting to see if TrekXI’s Spock is a logical continuation of Ambassador Spock from TNG, or if it’s altered somehow by JJ & Co. to fit in with the new storyline.

114. AJ - July 24, 2008

I agree with Closettrekker that X-Files shouldn’t be used as a benchmark for Trek.

It’s been a transformational year for genre films, and JJ is in the loop.

115. Closettrekker - July 24, 2008

#113—I think many people can enjoy TMP much better after reading the novelization. I think Spock was portrayed exactly as Roddenberry wrote him to be at that point—desperately trying to rid himself of his human “weaknesses” through Kholinar and trying to find himself. I never fully appreciated it, however, until I read the novelization. The events in TMP are a catalyst to Spock becoming the person we now know him to be (bearing in mind that his character is fictional–LOL). He finally stops trying to reject his human heritage (and its emotional baggage) and embraces it as something which makes him more balanced. I think we see the culmination of that in some of the dialogue in STVI.

116. AJ - July 24, 2008

Closettrekker:

I read that novel ages ago. What was the catalyst for Spock wanting to shed his humanity for Kolinahr? It seems that Spock in TWOK was the logical extension of Spock in TOS, and that his TMP character is somewhat of an anomaly, or even unnecessary except as a plot device.

Perhaps the breaking up of the Enterprise crew after the 5-year mission was too emotional for him? Kirk was promoted and McCoy left the service. Who knows?

117. Greg2600 - July 24, 2008

Nice interview, Nimoy is the best. Hope this movie doesn’t stink, because he’ll look bad. I definitely disagree with Leonard on The Motion Picture. That film had character interaction, though not to the level of the successor films. It’s the most true to the looking forward concept of TOS, and the only film to have any kind of creative influence from Gene Roddenberry. As for directors, well JJ has quite a bit of computer power to work with now, the others did not. Robert Wise and ILM’s work on TMP is legendary in my view.

118. Derek Evans - July 24, 2008

As a young boy of 9 or 10, who was one of the original ‘Trekkies’, I can’t even begin to express how thrilled I am with Leonard Nimoy being in this movie. I remember ‘
Star Trek’ in it’s 1st few years of syndication, waiting every Saturday Morning for the Animated Series–looking for any article or news clipping with a ‘Star Trek’ reference, and of course writing letters to Paramount!..I’m folowing this Movie with as much excitiment as I did TMP when I was 15 or 16!..I only wish that for one last time I could have ALL the original actors back…I guess that makes me a real geek. Oh well…I’m Owning It!! Deal LOL I will Always LOVE STAR TREK!!

119. Anthony Thompson - July 24, 2008

Mr. Nimoy has tons of class. That’s one reason I’m glad that he’s in the movie. He, unlike someone else we know, represents Star Trek so well!

120. The Underpants Monster - July 24, 2008

The progression of Spock from TOS to TMP to TWOK always seemed very organic to me.

121. Closettrekker - July 24, 2008

#120—I agree. In the beginning of the TMp novelization, it is clear that Spock is very uncomfortable with how easily he fits in with Kirk and McCoy, his warm feelings of friendship towards Kirk, and his natural inclinations toward those feelings in general. In part, he sees Kholinar as a way to be more Vulcan and rid himself of the shame he feels in being part human. It is only his experience with V’Ger and the aftermath which brings balance to Spock, IMO.

122. Joe Schmoe - July 24, 2008

#120 and #121

In the character arc of the Spock character, TMP is critical. He goes from wanting to purge human emotions totally, to in essence embracing or coming to terms with them.

He found his purpose after realizing that VGer didn’t know it’s purpose, and how empty that can be.

Spock after meeting VGer seems very comfortable in his skin.

In TNG, though, he seems kind of irritated and bitter. I just rewatched Unification, and he comes off annoyed most of the time. Definitely a human emotion. Sure, he was having a bad day, but he didn’t seem too concerned about keeping the emotions in check — at least to me.

123. Harry Ballz - July 24, 2008

Here’s an interesting thought……..if the revenge angle to the movie is Nero being the bastard son of Spock and the Romulan Commander……..could there be a surprise cameo by Joanne Linville (who played the Commander) in scenes that would flesh out this scenario?

Joanne is still with us, albeit 80 years old, and could nicely play the character at an advanced age. Talk about effectively “fleshing out” the backstory!

Wouldn’t it be a hoot to see her pop up in the film?

124. Closettrekker - July 24, 2008

#122—I agree on all points.

My only explanation for what you see in “Unification” is Spock’s total acceptance by that time that he is indeed half-human, and that his human half is just as meaningful as his Vulcan half. That is something he would never have accepted as a younger man (ironically, that is supported by his often used “human” defense mechanisms throughout TOS—like “Vulcans never do this…or Vulcans do not do that”), and again, something which can be traced directly to his experience with V’Ger and the clarity which that experience helped him to gain.

125. The Underpants Monster - July 24, 2008

Also, in Unification, he had put an awful lot on the line to achieve his goal. His career, his relationship with his family, and possibly even the fate of several civilizations. I think that’d make even the greenest-blooded Vulcan a bit testy if a Picard-shaped wrench suddenly turned up in the works.

126. Closettrekker - July 24, 2008

#123—-Absolutely, and she was fantastic as the Romulan Commander in TEI.

I wonder if the story might shed some light on whether Saavik was ever really pregnant, like in the novelizations, and whether that child was fathered by David or Spock (gone “Pon Farr Crazy” on Genesis). Orci is a huge fan of the novels. Does Spock marry Saavik, as some of the novels suggested? Or does he have 2 bastard children (lol)? Could Spock be behind on child support (perhaps the real reason he went to Romulus)?

Could Star Trek turn into a daytime tv series, opposite Days Of Our Lives or All My Children?

…I’ve gone too far…

127. The Underpants Monster - July 24, 2008

#126-Not just in the novelization, but in earlier drafts of the screenplay.

128. Andy Patterson - July 24, 2008

126

“Could Star Trek turn into a daytime tv series, opposite Days Of Our Lives or All My Children?”

Get Leeann Hunley on this series and I’m there. You could even throw in Thao Phenglis.

129. Closettrekker - July 24, 2008

#127—If I’m not mistaken, there was a scene in TVH where Kirk is addressing Saavik on Vulcan and mentions “her condition”. However, the scene ended up on the cutting room floor. Do I remember that correctly?

In any case, I always imagined that she was carrying Spock’s child.

One half Vulcan, one quarter human, and one quarter Romulan…perhaps raised by Saavik in the home of Sarek and Amanda Grayson?

It seems reasonable that Spock would find bonding with Saavik to be perfectly logical in that case…

Possibilities like that, along with the uncovered periods of TAS-TMP, TMP-TWOK (7.5 years) and TFF-TUC (5 years) make the future of Trek in the 23rd century very exciting to me, in all seriousness.

130. ByGeorge - July 24, 2008

#95

I agree, a good story will always make some type of statement about the human condition and therefore social commentary, but it happens because the story shows us an adventure of realistic characters in dramatic situations. The weakest story lines IMO were those who had no story to tell but rather shoved a social commentary in our faces and tried to make it tell a story. Its is like the difference between “Balance of Terror” verses “Let That Be Your Last Battlefield”. One was a great adventure story that had an element of prejudice in it. The other was a high handed allegory about prejudice in society today. I find the later tedious, boring, and non-adventurous.

ST4 was an adventure story about getting the Enterprise crew out of trouble with the Feds, saving yet another planet, time traveling, integrating Spock back into the ST world, and putting our heros back where they should be, exploring the galaxy. The whales were a vehicle by which they accomplished this and made a “Save the Whales” statement along the way. ST needs to stay adventurous, not preachy, to attract a new young audience.

131. Number 3 - July 24, 2008

umm…Anthony…what about…..Dear “GODS” of the next Star Trek movie…may you please bless us with a visual representation of the vehicle that Kirk&Co. travel around in outer-space with?……..I, as well as, I asume many others would love to see it. but “hey, I not demanding anything”.

Peace and long Life

132. Mike T. - July 24, 2008

#96 AJ, If Nero wants revenge on Spock, why have scenes of young Kirk on Earth and other points in pre Captain Kirks life?

133. AJ - July 24, 2008

129 et al:

It would be stupendous if Saavik or TEI are referenced and that Nero is Spock’s son.

Nimoy’s “revenge” theme really propels this idea forward, as there is no reason for Nero to exact revenge on Kirk, who’s already been dead for years. He is going back to murder young Kirk because of something that is wrong between him and Spock.

Only someone extremely close to Spock in the 24th century would know about Kirk’s influence on Spock’s life, and how killing him before their friendship would make Spock a lesser man.

Only issue is these damned alternate realities.

134. Vulcan Soul - July 24, 2008

It is quite interesting and amusing that he mentions TMP and its focus on “concepts” (not without some disdain), juxtaposing it with the new movie, when that was really the one film in the movie series that came closest to what classic, hard science fiction was all about – not characters, but concepts. Real science fiction has a very analytical quality to it and is more about ideas than emotions, about scenarios, effects and relations rather than relationships.

In that, it is very clear that JJ Abrams’ Trek, as most, if not all productions branded as “science fiction” today, could not be farther away from what this label used to mean. As such, we might as well toss it and use the “space opera” moniker that is much more fitting, even if not well-liked for its supposed negative connotations.

A quintessential drama, adventure or action movie set in a futuristic (space) setting should not be called science fiction just for its setting when it misses all the pecularities that really define the genre.

135. AJ - July 24, 2008

132/Mike T.

I think it’s important, as new Trek goes forward, to show the life of Kirk and Spock as boys growing up. Character development.

Nero is “monster of the week” and these new young characters have to go to 2 more sequels at least. Maybe JJ wants to show Kirk and Nero in a good bust-up fight. Who knows?

Maybe he wants to kill Kirk after he and Spock are friends to trigger some kind of regret in Spock that will create a void in him which will send him straight to the monastery or Kholinar, so he never becomes a great man or impacts history.

Maybe Nero is going back for humpback whales. We’re all wrong, most likely, but it is fun to speculate.

136. classictrek - July 24, 2008

what integrity Mr Nimoy has. this movie is lucky to have him still around lending his marvelous insight into what makes star trek great.

greg
UK

137. Mike - July 24, 2008

#112. Closettrekker

As I admitted above, I’m wavering between a state of hot and cold. If you want to call it pessimism–an exaggeration, but okay. Don’t think it’s a crime to be concerned.

I like to be surprised at the movies and when I see elements of this film, that seem worn, or weak, I get antsy. Yes, Romulans haven’t appeared much in the movies, and for good reason–they make weak antagonist–in my opinion. It won’t surprise me at all if the “Romulans” in the new film, don’t behave likes past Romulans at all. Would be a smart move.

This will be the third time we’ve seen the time gimmick, and yes, I’m counting Generations; and add to this the countless and countless TV shows–including TREK–and movies we’ve seen time stories and it has just gotten old and tiring. Add to this the complexity of alternate timelines–as seen in BTTF 2, and I get a little troubled. Fan-boys may get off on this stuff, but will it turn off the general audience–the very audience Abrams and company are after? Don’t know, but I am concerned.

We’ve seen the revenge gimmick five times in TREK movies: Khan–ST2; Alien Probe–ST4; Picard–ST 8; The Son’a (Ru’afo)–ST 9; Shinzon–ST 10.

Yes, I like the idea of seeing how TOS crew came together, but even that is well worn. There is no rule that says you have to start a film series with how it all began.

You wrote–
Furthermore, even if your concerns about X-Files are justified, what does one former TV guy’s flop have to do with JJ Abrams? They are certainly not the same person. Is it based solely upon the fact that both individuals have done both television and film? That is a pretty thin thread, my friend.

No, it’s more than that, my friend. Beyond the fact they are both TV level directors my concern is: why must TREK movies constantly not have superior, proven talent in the director’s chair? Why does Paramount continue to under value STAR TREK? Like Robert Wise and TMP, I just would like to see a cinematic director helm a TREK film and not a novelist, actors, an editor or a TV producer / writer. It’s good to see a gigantic budget, but why not a talented, cinematic director who can really do something with it? Perhaps you under estimate the talent that great, cinematic directors can bring… I don’t. As someone pointed out: compare the bridge assault scene in Abrams’ MI3 to James Camerons’ bridge assault scene in TRUE LIES and you’ll see, a director makes a difference. Plus, it doesn’t exactly give me confidence when I read Abrams needs a tips or advice in making a scene or shot better from Spielberg.

138. Dom - July 24, 2008

Mike. Your remarks about The X Files are doubtless influenced by a review on Aintitcool.com by a guy who had little time for the show and a couple of talkbackers who might not even have really seen the film. In my experience, a lot of people used to gripe about The X Files when it was first run and yet it still got an audience. I bought the complete series boxset a few weeks back and have just started season two. It truly is a great show and I can’t see that the relatively low-budget spin-off movie can fail to grab an audience!

And quite how the performance of a $30 million-ish horror thriller shot in Vancouver for a different studio impacts next year’s Star Trek film is beyond me!

I can’t wait to see The X Files. At least three people I know casually who rarely go to the cinema want me to go with them. And I greatly appreciate that both The X Files and Star Trek are running under a veil of secrecy. After years of websites and magazines ruining shows and movies for me it’s nice that I can read websites without having these films wrecked.

I still remember Dreamwatch magazine revealing the death of Stephen Williams’s X character on the front cover several weeks before that episode was shown!

There are too many characters here being miseries! If I had to listen to the bleatings of some of the pessimists here and the fanatics here, I’d throw myself off Hammersmith Bridge!

139. AJ - July 24, 2008

137/Mike:

I agree that Abrams needs to prove his chops with this film. He has loads of cash to make it real.

But can you imagine if a James Cameron or a Ridley Scott were in charge? Even Michael Bay? Would we have this sense that the franchise is in good hands?

140. Mike - July 24, 2008

138.
Sorry Dom. Hate to be the barer of bad news, but the reviews are trickling in and it ain’t good. Reviews from AICN, New York Times, Reuters, E-Oline, Salt Lake Deseret News…all negative.

And, once again, the similarity in the movies are both are helmed by a TV writer / producer. When I need a doctor, I don’t go to a dentist. There is an art to directing and why hollywood studios continue to give the reins of films to those not best qualified is beyond me.

Both, Abrams and Carter may turn out to be good, even great directors, but neither is at that point now. Seeing how critical this movie is to the future of STAR TREK, I would have given 160 million to a more seasoned director. The same goes for the X-Files’ film. At least Fox had the good sense to hand a moderate budget to Carter.

141. Summer Storm Pictures - July 24, 2008

I am just as much a fan of William Shatner as any “first generation” Star Trek fan, but even so, even I have to admit that some of the most poignant scenes in all of the original cast Star Trek were between Nimoy and Kelly (Spock and McCoy). To me, they were the heart and soul of Star Trek. Kelly is sadly no longer with us but if he were, boy would it have been nice to have had them both together just once more.

142. Buddy Cianci - July 24, 2008

As much as I am a fan of Leonard Nimoy, I just can’t get excited over this film without Shatner.

143. Closettrekker - July 24, 2008

#137—I don’t think pessimism is an exaggeration at all. You claim to be “hot” and “cold”…well, all that I see is cold.

I have some issues with your contentions.

1)Generations and the nexus have nothing to do with actual time travel.

2)Revenge themes are far from being gimmicks, whether you’re talking about reality or fantasy. Motives of revenge are timeless themes that all men may identify with. Furthermore, the films you list certainly have varied degrees of emphasis on revenge.

a) TWOK—revenge is certainly the most obvious, yet still very much a secondary theme
b) TVH—-absolutely no “theme” of revenge whatsoever; the simple existence of am antagonist within the story who seeks some form of retribution for one thing or another hardly constitutes a “theme”
c) FC—unlike in TWOK, revenge is actually a more “primary” theme, rather than a secondary one
d) INS—another secondary use of revenge
e) NEM—again, no revenge theme at all; Shinzon is morally crippled by envy, lustful for power, and interested in self-preservation. That hardly constitutes a “theme” of revenge

So, let’s recap: we have 10 films. In one of them, revenge is the primary theme. In two others, revenge is a secondary theme. The two others you attempted to place under that umbrella have no revenge “theme” to them whatsoever.

Primary revenge theme…10%
Secondary revenge theme…20%

3) True Lies? Are you serious? James Cameron hasn’t made a good movie in about a decade and a half. I don’t get what you think is so impressive about anything in that film.

JJ Abrams is the first A-list name in Hollywood since the (then over the hill) Robert Wise in the late 70′s to direct a Star Trek movie.

If you were expecting Paramount to get Martin Scorsese to direct a Star Trek film, then you are delusional…The best Paramount will realistically do is to get a once great director who is past his prime (like Wise) or get a hot young director on the way up (like Abrams).

4) No one is suggesting that the only movie to do was an origin story. It is simply something which has never actually been done. TNG had “Encounter At Farpoint”, DS9 had “The Emissary”, VOY had “Caretaker”, and ENT had “Broken Bow”.
The TOS crew never had their origin story, and it is a romantic notion to crossover Leonard Nimoy with the recasting (that I have wanted for 20 years) of Star Trek’s most iconic characters. The best thing for the franchise, IMO, was to go back to its roots. The only characters with even close to the appeal necessary to do what Paramount and JJ Abrams are trying to do with the franchise are the iconic originals, and the obvious way to tie Star Trek’s beginning with where the 24th Century spinoffs left us is with a time travel or flashback type of story. Apparently, JJ is going to do little bit of both.

5) As for the Romulans, I would agree with you (to some degree), in that the Romulans have not been portrayed well in the last 40 years. However, I rather enjoyed them as mysterious xenophobic villains in TOS. It is the Klingons which have been overdone. The Romulans (post-TOS)have always been very superficial and under-developed.

I have a feeling that is about to change. I love that the scriptwriters are fans. I like what Bob has to say and respect that he is willing to come here and mix it up a bit. I like that Nimoy is there too.

For what it’s worth, I sincerely hope you lighten up a bit and allow yourself a bit of excitement again about new Star Trek. Anything they give us in May is 100% more than we are getting now.

I am not a huge fantasy and sci-fi fan. That ended for me, very gradually, over the last couple of decades. For me, Star Trek is it in that realm/genre. It is the last bastion of my childhood sci-fi fixation.

With that said, I haven’t paid to see a ST movie since TUC…If this were a different kind of Trek project (TNG, for example), I wouldn’t be paying for STXI either. But it is a modern look at my Trek…That is what has me excited.

144. Harry Ballz - July 24, 2008

Closettrekker, very nicely said! Bravo!

145. Notbob - July 25, 2008

Not that I means much but, I am actually a bit of a film buff and I have to add my ten cents here on a few topics:

1. Abrams in an interview I read said that he could have done a better job in certain shots for Mission Impossible III. He said that some of the shots he utilized were more in line with a T.V. show than a film. This guy shows me that he can admit his mistakes. That he can see them. That suggests to me that he was aware there was room for improvement. And someone mentioned him getting Spielberg’s advice. If you’re a director and you know Spielberg —I don’t care if you’re Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, Eastwood, or the Coen brothers –you’re a damn fool if you don’t turn to him for advice. The same can be said of Spielberg towrds the others. Why? They all have proven themselves time and time again and each has also screwed up every now and then. Sometime they may have advice that you would not have thought of because….I don’t know, you’re producing one show here, have a new show there etc. It would probably be a good time to point out that my concearn here is that Abrams has a lot on his plate at the moment and he has had many successes. He’s bound to have a failure any day now. And for the record, sometimes having a lot of other work to do turns out to be a good thing. Case in point,The Empire Strikes Back was not directed by George Lucas and most agree now that it’s the best of the Star Wars films.

2. The mention of the Empire Strikes Back brings me to the topic of reviews. If you rely on reviewers to tell you if a movie is good or not, you probably should not be watching T.V. or voting. When Empire Strikes Back came out it was not a reviewers favorite. It had a bleak ending. That’s because it was a second act in a three act play. Blade Runner was not well received. Citizen Cane was not either. Wizard of Oz was not loved by all–young and old. Apocalypse Now wasn’t either. Sometimes reading or hearing someone else’s negative review sets you up subconciously for not liking a film. I find that I have to watch a movie and watch it again a day or so later to see if I was feeling too harsh. I had to do this with Transformers. I was distracted by the poor attempts at jokes that I found myself not paying attention to the rest of the movie. Upon a second watching it was not as bad. I was prepared for the lame attempts at humor. But, hey, what do I know I liked Waterworld. I thought it could have been better if shaved down by about 20 or 30 minutes, but I liked it. At the same time, Lost in Translation did not move me, it was not great and if it fell off the face of the Earth I would not lose any sleep. I didn’t bye the hype. I did for Juno and that was actually shockingly really good. But I digress.

And most reviews I read for the second Pirates movie were usually very poor. Very few reviewers had anything positive to say other than they liked Depp. I liked it. I liked it so much that was the movie that made me go out and get the series on DVD. I know I must not be the only one who liked IT. Look at all the people who went to see it in the theatre over and over again.

146. The Underpants Monster - July 25, 2008

I’m curious – if you consider revenge to be the secondary theme of TWOK, what do you consider to be the primary one? I mean, er, its kind of the title of the movie and all.

147. star trackie - July 25, 2008

#112 “Furthermore, even if your concerns about X-Files are justified, what does one former TV guy’s flop have to do with JJ Abrams? ”

Well, the first X-files movies was hardly a flop. If I recall correctly, it opened at 30 something million and made around 80 million domestic. And this was 10 years ago. And the direction was just fine. The story…well, that’s another thing.. lol

148. Horatio - July 25, 2008

#146 Re: Revenge theme in TWOK

What I understood Closettrekker to mean was that even though Khan’s main motivation in the film was revenge it wasn’t the actual theme of the film.

Whereas TMP was a film about Spock finding himself, becoming comfortable with his human half and realizing he needed it, TWOK was the Kirk coming of age film where he deals with his mortality, ageing, screwed up relationships from his youth and the repercussions of those mistakes many years later. AT the end of TMP Spock was finally comfortable with himself. At the end of TWOK Kirk had made peace with many of his demons – ironically at the cost of his closest friend.

Just my rambled thoughts.

149. The Underpants Monster - July 25, 2008

Right, I think I understood what Closettrekker was saying. But Khan’s motivation, and subsequent actions, from this viewer’s persepctive anyway, form the backbone on which the entire film hangs – its whole raison d’etre, as it were. If he/she sees it otherwise, I’m curious as to what he/she believes to be the “primary” theme if not that.

150. Mike - July 25, 2008

143. Closettrekker
You wrote–
I don’t think pessimism is an exaggeration at all. You claim to be “hot” and “cold”…well, all that I see is cold.

Remember, my post was in response to the revelation that revenge was a factor in the new film, hence, I have been writing on the “cold”, since, for now, I find that a little cliche. It was you that jumped to the conclusion I was being only negative, completely ignoring the fact that I stated I was also “hot” for the new movie–not even giving me the benefit of the doubt. Rather negative and presumptuous of you, don’t you think? If expressing negative vibes troubles you, I’ll point out more positive points below.

You wrote–
1) Generations and the nexus have nothing to do with actual time “travel”.

2) Revenge themes are far from being gimmicks, whether you’re talking about reality or fantasy. Motives of revenge are timeless themes that all men may identify with. Furthermore, the films you list certainly have varied degrees of emphasis on revenge.

I didn’t say time travel, I said time gimmick. One of the characters in the movie Generations mentions the characters were phasing in and out of the space/time continuum. Sounds time related to me. Once again I’ll state: it’s not just time stories in TREK TV / movies I’m tiresome of, it’s Hollywood’s continued overuse of it as a science fiction crutch that’s wearing on me.

Continual use of devices, to whatever degree, in the small corner of TREK movies, constitute gimmicks and crutches as far as I’m concerned. They are weak and easy substitutes for creative, dramatic writing and conflict. Of course, you are entitled to your opinions ’bout time stories and revenge, and I welcome them, but I find your arguments semantical.

You wrote–
3) True Lies? Are you serious? James Cameron hasn’t made a good movie in about a decade and a half. I don’t get what you think is so impressive about anything in that film.

Cameron has hardly made any films in the last decade and a half. What has that got to do with his enormous talent in setting up an action scene or sequence–which was the point I was making?

You wrote–
JJ Abrams is the first A-list name in Hollywood since the (then over the hill) Robert Wise in the late 70’s to direct a Star Trek movie.

If you were expecting Paramount to get Martin Scorsese to direct a Star Trek film, then you are delusional…The best Paramount will realistically do is to get a once great director who is past his prime (like Wise) or get a hot young director on the way up (like Abrams).

If making one film–and that film hardly anything to brag about, in my opinion–gets you A-list status in Hollywood, it’s no wonder films today suck as much as they do. Abrams will be lucky to be mentioned in the same paragraph as Wise in film history–at least for now. Despite Nimoy’s insistence that he is a great director, let him make a few films–at least good ones–before we start calling him great and putting him on a pedestal, shall we?

Like Paramount, I think you too are devaluing STAR TREK. There are many fine directors in Hollywood, seasoned directors with many films under their belts that would have taken this multi-million dollar assignment. I doubt Scorsese or Woody Allen would be right for this film anyway. That’s just dumb. What this film needs is a director who can set up action sequences with epic and stylistic flair, has a definite visual style and command of the craft–along with handling intimate and dramatic moments, of course. That’s something I notice a lot of TV based talents are unable to do.

You wrote–
I have a feeling that is about to change. I love that the scriptwriters are fans. I like what Bob has to say and respect that he is willing to come here and mix it up a bit. I like that Nimoy is there too.

For what it’s worth, I sincerely hope you lighten up a bit and allow yourself a bit of excitement again about new Star Trek. Anything they give us in May is 100% more than we are getting now.

Since I stated I was hot for the movie too, I agree there are some wonderful things to get excited about: I love the casting; love the fact we are finally getting a respectable budget; happy about most of the production crew; happy Shatner isn’t in the film; happy Paramount is not under selling TREK, and are willing to premiere it as a lead summer blockbuster. That being said, I don’t like the time travel/alternate timeline elements; don’t like the use of go-go boots and mini-shirts; don’t like the revenge angle; and am lukewarm about Nimoy being in the film.

All this is premature, obviously, and perhaps my views will change, but I have a right to how I feel. I do find it silly to believe I have to agree and like all aspects and decisions of the film and be told I need to lighten up. I’m not an automaton or puppet. Perhaps you are one of those fans who will swallow everything TPTB feed you. I am not.

Mr Orci has said many times he and the producers of the film are open to fan opinions, even questioning ones. Glad he can handle negative feedback. You should follow his lead.

151. Closettrekker - July 25, 2008

#150—-”Glad he can handle negative feedback. You should follow his lead.”

I can handle it just fine, but that does not mean I will not respond to it.

“If making one film–and that film hardly anything to brag about, in my opinion–gets you A-list status in Hollywood, it’s no wonder films today suck as much as they do.”

I said “A-list Hollywood name…not director.”

Abrams is a highly sought after commodity in the business (whose star is on the rise), whether you feel it is justified or not.

“I love the casting; love the fact we are finally getting a respectable budget; happy about most of the production crew; happy Shatner isn’t in the film; happy Paramount is not under selling TREK, and are willing to premiere it as a lead summer blockbuster.”

There you go.

152. Closettrekker - July 25, 2008

#146—”I’m curious – if you consider revenge to be the secondary theme of TWOK, what do you consider to be the primary one?”

Aging/Life/death…From the opening sequence in the KM training scenario (and the Kirk/McCoy conversation over Jim’s B-day) to the closing scene (the birth of the Genesis Planet in the wake of Spock’s death), this is the film’s primary theme. The revenge theme (and the Kirk/Khan conflict in general) is secondary, IMO. It is the catalyst, if you will, in tying together the primary theme from beginning to end.

153. krikzil - July 25, 2008

Where DID James Cameron go anyway? Was he crushed under the pile of $$ he made from Titantic?

154. Closettrekker - July 25, 2008

#150—-”I think you too are devaluing STAR TREK”

That would imply that I have some say in the matter, which I do not.

As for Paramount, if there were a much respected and accomplished director waiting to do a Star Trek film, then in my opinion, it would already have been done. Paramount agreed to approve this project because a) they liked Orci and Kurtzman’s script; and b) JJ Abrams had already agreed to direct and help pitch the idea to the studio.

I was being sarcastic about Scorcese, of course. As much as I love Star Trek, the franchise hasn’t had any real feature film credibility in a long time (certainly not justifying this kind of budget). JJ Abrams is willing to take a shot at giving ST the treatment which I believe it has long deserved and had the potential for.

Am I worried? Absolutely not. What for? Star Trek has been in a coma, with no immediate hope for waking up, so it cannot possibly get any worse. What we have now is zero…nothing. Whatever we get in May is going to be bonus–the way I look at it. I won’t spend my time worrying about a movie of which I have no control. I’d rather be hopeful. If it tanks, I still have my dvd collection.

155. The Underpants Monster - July 25, 2008

Interesting take, CT, and I can see its logic.

I look at it more as conflict between past and future. One must make a decision to leave one behind for the other, and revenge is the ultimate expression of the failure to do that. In terms of Victorian literature, Khan would be Kirk’s “tragic double,” the example of what he could or would become if he doesn’t make the right choices.

156. AJ - July 25, 2008

TWOK is about that stage in one’s life when a person questions whether all he has done has been right or wrong. Leaving Khan and Co. on Ceti Alpha V, leaving Carol Marcus and David for the career, etc. It’s about the choices we make, and how we deal with the consequences.

Spock died to save the ship knowing the consequences, and was quite satisfied to do it for duty, and because his friends, and the crew, would die.

In the last few minutes of TWOK, after the Reliant explodes, I forgot entirely about Khan. Khan and his revenge were simply a vehicle to give Kirk his life back. As Bones said, “Get back your command…before you really do grow old.”

157. AJ - July 25, 2008

I am now going to imagine a Star Trek film directed by Woody Allen (circa early ’70′s, of course).

158. Closettrekker - July 25, 2008

#148—-Absolutely. By the end of the film, Kirk has become more comfortable with his aging and his place in the Universe, whereas when the film begins, he is soured by the prospect and his perspective is accordingly bleak. “Aging” is a major part of it, but the overall theme is life and death (aging is the process in between).

“Galloping around the cosmos is a game for the young, Doctor.”—Kirk to McCoy

“Damnit, Jim. Other people have birthdays. Why are we treating yours like a funeral?”—-McCoy to Kirk

“Get your command back…before you become part of this collection.”—McCoy to Kirk

“How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life…wouldn’t you say?”—Kirk to Saavik

“Genesis is life… from lifelessness.”—-Carol Marcus

“There’s a man out there I haven’t seen in 15 years who’s trying to kill me. You show me a son who’d be happy to help him…How do I feel? Old.”—Kirk to Carol

“Let me show you something that will make you feel…young, as when the World was new.”—Carol to Kirk

“Saavik was right. You never faced death.”—David to Kirk

“Not like this….I cheated my way out of death…”—Kirk to David

“I feel young.”—-Kirk to Carol

159. Closettrekker - July 25, 2008

#156—-My thoughts exactly. Very well said.

160. AJ - July 25, 2008

If you want a film where revenge is the main theme, and I will happily take criticism on this, look at Ridley Scott’s “Gladiator.”

Themes of familial love, the lust for power, democracy over despotism, the value of human life—they are all there. But the overriding story is how one man uses the spectacle of the games to get to the Emperor and avenge his family’s death. When he dies, knowing it’s been achieved, and sees his family in heaven, he’s happy. End.

161. Dom - July 25, 2008

Mike, if Abrams’ TV background makes him a no-go for a big-budget Hollywood films, then how dare they have hired Steven Spielberg, the famous director of Marcus Welby MD, Columbo and Night Gallery episodes, to make Jaws and Close Encounters of the Third Kind!

162. The Underpants Monster - July 25, 2008

In the same vein of thought, given all the speculation about Nero in the other thread, I’m wondering if he isn’t going to turn out to be a tragic double for Spock. Given the whole “Is he really Romulan?” hint, I think it would be an interesting story if Nero, like Spock, turned out to come from a similarly conflicting background, but through circumstances and choices hadn’t dealt with it in such a positive manner.

163. The Underpants Monster - July 25, 2008

For me, the whole old/young thing hinged on the living in the past vs. looking to the future theme, and not the other way around.

In the end, Kirk _feels_ young because he is no longer dwelling on the past he might have had with David, the depressing career choices he made, or even the loss of his dearest friend, but is looking to a future that he will create as an active participant rather than a victim of circumstance. I saw the Genesis planet as a symbol of actively creating something positive and vibrant from the void that was previously there. It’s not really a renewal, because there was nothing there before to renew.

164. Closettrekker - July 25, 2008

#163—-”In the end, Kirk _feels_ young because he is no longer dwelling on the past he might have had with David, the depressing career choices he made, or even the loss of his dearest friend, but is looking to a future that he will create as an active participant rather than a victim of circumstance. I saw the Genesis planet as a symbol of actively creating something positive and vibrant from the void that was previously there. It’s not really a renewal, because there was nothing there before to renew.”

That’s just an interesting spin on the same principle, IMO. But the fact reamins that Kirk begins the film (10 years after the end of the 5 year mission) in a depressed state. It is the same depressed state which drives men to have the proverbial “mid-life crisis”. His birthday serves to remind him that time is passing him by, as it does all men. Ultimately, he faces (head on, through the death of his friend) the realization that death is a part of life, and he comes to embrace his own words to Saavik (“How we deal with death is at least as important as how we deal with life.”).

You are right in that he continues to question his career choices (something first dealt with in TMP). McCoy and Spock both openly challenge his decision, 10 years earlier to accept promotion, and indicate to him that starship captain is the role in which he belongs (his first, best destiny).
But I see that as a “character development arc”, begun in TMP—when Kirk first questions his decision to join the Admiralty, and not fully resolved until the end of TVH—when Kirk is demoted to captain and given another starship command, rather than an actual “theme”.

Either way, TWOK is much deeper than Khan’s quest for revenge against James Kirk. The revenge story is a plot device.

165. Mike - July 25, 2008

151, 154. Closettrekker
You wrote–
Abrams is a highly sought after commodity in the business (whose star is on the rise), whether you feel it is justified or not.

It may be justified. Only the future can really say. It’s not his star I’m questioning though, it’s his directorial skills at this point in his career. Just would have liked to have seen a top notch stylist– whose skills are already developed–take control of the directorial reins, along with that wonderful budget, that’s all. He does seem like a nice guy and a good and talented producer. Also, I like the fact that seems to “get” STAR TREK.

You wrote–
As for Paramount, if there were a much respected and accomplished director waiting to do a Star Trek film, then in my opinion, it would already have been done. Paramount agreed to approve this project because a) they liked Orci and Kurtzman’s script; and b) JJ Abrams had already agreed to direct and help pitch the idea to the studio.

We may never really know why Paramount never sought out, was unable or unwilling to find accomplished directors, just like we don’t know why they never gave the films sufficient budgets after TMP. Sure, TMP was disappointing, but it didn’t completely bomb. Not privy to what goes on in the minds of Paramount executives. Any attempt would be speculative, but, like you, I am glad the new guard at the studio is willing to take a shot.

I am concerned about the film, but not worried, after all, in the end, it is just a movie. The future may have passed TREK by and people may have little interest in it. We shall see. Thanks.

166. AJ - July 25, 2008

165: Mike:

Your last paragraph there opens a mighty can of worms. No advertising. Iron Man has grossed $566m worldwide. Do you think it’s because of the fan base? It had a kickass teaser and trailer.

Star Trek has only now just started its marketing campaign, and it’s a sleepy teaser, a dead website, plus a set of posters. Almost no presence in San Diego (equals TV coverage on G4), and an apology from JJ in EW. Also, a questionable co-promotion with Intel with a faulty website. Wow! You fire people for campaigns like this.

I just hope the best is yet to come.

167. Mike - July 25, 2008

166.

Well, that’s a good question. Hasn’t gotten off to a good start, has it?

Comic book movies are hot right now, so maybe that explains Iron Man in part; small marketing and advertising campaigns works for something the audience clearly wants to see anyway.

I’m not all that surprised at Paramount and Abrams handling of marketing so far for TREK though. Both are being consistent with the way they have handled such things in the past, meaning, rather strange. Paramount has always had screwy ideas for the way it has marketed TREK movies and Abrams secrecy campaign, might have worked for Cloverfield, but not sure that’s the best approach for TREK. It may be the right way for the fan base, but the wrong way to handle it for capturing the general audience–the very audience this film will need if it is to show a profit.

168. Closettrekker - July 25, 2008

#166,167—-I fully expect an aggressive campaign for STXI (in spite of Abrams) on the part of Paramount, beginning around Christmastime. I think that 4.5 month period is about all the time which STXI can sustain the fuly charged hype machine. Until that time, I expect more of the same, with an occasional tidbit here and there.

169. Greg2600 - July 25, 2008

To follow up on “Unification,” as foreign as Shatner/Kirk was in that movie alongside Picard, Nimoy/Spock’s appearance in Unification I think was worse. A hugely lackluster two-parter, which has not held up well, and is the main point of concern I have for Nimoy appearing in this film without Shatner. Spock was left to mutter all his trademark one-liners to Data and Picard, and neither played off him well at all. I realize this time Spock will interact with the old characters, but not the original actors. I just don’t see myself being comfortable either way. Either they go the Generations route, and essentially try to reinvent the character their own way, or the Unification route, and hand feed the character as a characature.

170. krikzil - July 25, 2008

Greg2600–I felt the same way. Unification was disappointing to me and I won’t even start about Generataions! I’ve always thought Kirk and Spock were “less” without the other but then their relationship is my primary attraction to Star Trek. The rest is gravy.

171. Dom - July 26, 2008

Hopefully we’ll get some sparkling repartee between Chris Pine’s Kirk and Leonard Nimoy’s Spock!

I agree about the disappointment with Unification, but, although Spock and Kirk (and McCoy) are interdependent, I think Spock didnt work in TNG simply because TNG was a completely different show from Star Trek and the crossover worked about as well as Jason Bourne would appearing in a James Bond film.

It’s all in the writing. I reckon Ron Moore could write a much better Spock, 17 years after his last appearance. It was always a mistake to feature TOS characters in TNG. In this case we’re crossing a character from TOS into a revamped version. With luck, as Leonard Nimoy said, he’s around familiar characters and therefore much more at home!

172. Closettrekker - July 26, 2008

#172—Well said.

173. Harry Ballz - July 26, 2008

Gee, Closettrekker, I’ve never seen somebody compliment their own post before………just remember, “self-praise is no recommendation”.

Nyuk, nyuk………………

174. Mike - July 26, 2008

168.

Possibly. We shall see.

175. Closettrekker - July 26, 2008

#173—Someone’s got to do it!

176. Cygnus-X1 - July 27, 2008

Good interview, but there were quite a few typos in the article.

I looked sideways at the writer during some of them.

Metaphorically, of course.

177. Declaration! - July 29, 2008

Anything Spock says is good by me. Despite any skepticism, I will see the movie because of him.

It’s funny that anything so simple as a movie would deserve such attention. I guess everyone here just kinda wanted to talk about star trek, which is fine.

I hereby declare trek movie the official trek community site, as the other sites seem to primarily concern themselves with the exacting specifics of imaginary doodads. We argue about canon and non-canon, thematic and stylistic choices, which is way cooler.

178. Fat Albert - December 17, 2008

‘Live long and prosper’

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179. Apostle Bishop Tarrance Darmon Austin Sr. - December 22, 2008

Good to see Leonard back.

180. Patty - January 10, 2009

Dear Anthony:

I don’t even know if you’ll see this, but I have a question for you about this interview.

When I Googled and it came up with this interview, the Google reference mentioned that Mr. Nimoy was asked about his son, Adam Nimoy’s upcoming book. Did he offer any opinion about that? Just curious.

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