Star Trek Author Vonda McIntyre Reveals How Sulu Got His First Name | TrekMovie.com
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Star Trek Author Vonda McIntyre Reveals How Sulu Got His First Name July 2, 2010

by TrekMovie.com Staff , Filed under: Books,Feature Films (TMP-NEM),Star Trek (2009 film),TOS , trackback

Back in 1981 author Vonda N McIntyre wrote the first original Star Trek novel for Pocket Books, "The Entropy Effect", and then went on to write a number of other Trek books and movie adaptations. Today McIntyre has a guest blog at io9 discussing the genesis of her work on Star Trek, including how she came up with Sulu’s first name

 

Sulu gets a name

In a guest blog post at io9, Vonda McIntyre writes about writing one of the first Star Trek novels "The Entropy Effect" (1981), which was the second Star Trek novel published by Pocket Books (the first being the book adaptation of Star Trek: The Motion Picture). Her blog contains a passage on how she gave Sulu a first name:

The only potential glitch in the Star Trek books came about because I couldn’t figure out how to write a love scene where the protagonists called each other by their surnames. So I gave Mr. Sulu a first name, "Hikaru," which is from The Tale of Genji. I was blissfully unaware of the glitch till long after the fact; someone at Paramount objected to the idea of the character’s having a given name, for reasons unclear to me. David had the good idea of asking Gene Roddenberry and George Takei their opinion, and both of them said "Go for it" or words to that effect. And so Mr. Sulu has a first name.

Sulu’s first name Hikaru eventually made it into official canon in the 1991 film Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. This is not the only time that material from (non-canon) Star Trek books made its way into official Star Trek canon. For example, in the 2009 Star Trek movie, Uhura’s first name Nyota, and Kirk’s mother’s name Winona were both derived from previous non-canon Star Trek books.


Hikaru, Winona, and Nyota got their names from the books

There is more to McIntyre’s blog, so read the rest at io9.


Original 1981 cover for "The Entropy Effect"

 

 

 

 

Comments

1. Scruffy the Janitor/Vampire Slayer - July 2, 2010

I really enjoyed her books way back when.

Thanks for the article.

2. Praetor Shinzon II - July 2, 2010

Have no problem with Hikaru or Nyota but Winona!?! Who came up with THAT crap name? That’s southern trailer trash name, not Iowa cornfield name! What book is that from, I’ll make a point never to read it.

3. Max - July 2, 2010

Entropy Effect is a good read. Wasn’t crazy about Enterprise:The First Adventure though.

4. RobertZ - July 2, 2010

Also a big Thanks!
I remember the day I bought The Entropy Effect. I love her work.

5. MJ - July 2, 2010

I thinks it is time we give a name to the middle N initial in Vonda’s name. How about: Vonda Nogura McIntyre — the great great great great great great grandmother of Admiral Nogura!

6. KingDaniel - July 2, 2010

I loved Vonda’s The Entropy Effect and Enterprise: The First Adventure. I still see the latter as how the TOS crew got together in the Prime universe.

People say all the time that the novels “aren’t canon” -which is true-, but it’s often said with the implication that they’re somehow of lesser worth than the TV shows and films. As far as I’m concerned, TV/film Trek is only half the story. There have been some amazing and some terrible Star Trek novels over the years, just like there have been amazing and terrible episodes and movies.

Any chance of Vonda writing a nuTrek novel one day?

(oh yeah – and you gotta love Fearsome Hippie Sulu on the cover of Entropy Effect!)

7. CmdrR - July 2, 2010

Wow, that was one of the really good novels. Nice to know TPTB took notice. Strangers from the Sky is also a great one… and a better genesis story than ST09, imho.

8. Vultan - July 2, 2010

2

Funny, I never thought of Winona Ryder as being southern trailer trash. According to Wikipedia, she was born in Olmstead County, Minnesota and named after nearby Winona County–both of which are in the NORTH, I believe.

9. Cap'n Calhoun - July 2, 2010

“This is not the only time that material from novels made its way into books”

Not surprisingly, this happens with pretty much every novel they write.

10. mntrekfan - July 2, 2010

Wow, have some issues with names, #2? I’m sure the great people of WINONA, MN would have some words with you! There is othing wrong with that name. I think it has a very MIDWESTERN name and fits perfectly for the character.

11. robowarrior - July 2, 2010

I have that book.

12. CaptainDonovin - July 2, 2010

I live in MN & have been to Winona, nice town. As for Winona Kirk, I see nothing wrong with the name but see someone definately has some issues.

13. S. John Ross - July 2, 2010

Awesome little anecdote :)

Tales of the inexplicable madness of Paramount approvals processes never fail to give my heart a comforting lil’ hug :/ They objected to a character … having a name.

And I thought I already knew some doozies :)

14. That One Guy - July 2, 2010

Huh. I did not know that. I can’t believe his name wasn’t mentioned until VI.

This is why I read the books, because you never know when something might be brought up.

15. Another Q - July 2, 2010

Always liked Vonda McIntyre’s work – Entropy Effect
was one of the first Trek novels I read & I thought it
was very original and imaginative.

16. "Check the Circuit!" - July 2, 2010

Ask Peter David about the goofy crap he had to deal with from the empty suits at Paramount during his DC Comics run (and I assume his various novels). Completely inane stuff.

17. "Check the Circuit!" - July 2, 2010

This was one of my favorite novels in the Trek fiction library. I turn a scene from it into a screenplay for an assignment in a creative writing class back in college. I used the scene where Kirk is shot with the spiderweb bullet.

(Got an “A”…helps when you’re working with great source material. )

18. S. John Ross - July 2, 2010

#16: I second the recommendation of Peter David’s anecdotes; I’ve heard several at cons and, yeah.

#OP: “This is not the only time that material from (non-canon) Star Trek books made its way into official Star Trek canon.”

Quite ;)

19. Bucky - July 2, 2010

I’m really simple: It’s all canon. Unless something directly contradicts something in the TV/movies (which is “paramount”. Heh.) it all happened. So, yes, the TOS/TNG crew did roll with the X-Men. They just don’t talk about it that much.

20. P Technobabble - July 2, 2010

One of my favorite Trek books.

21. S. John Ross - July 2, 2010

#19: “So, yes, the TOS/TNG crew did roll with the X-Men. They just don’t talk about it that much.”

Yeah, that’s my preferred attitude as well … what’s “real” to me, personally, in Trek is approximately 100% more important than what the suits tell me is real … pick and choose, or simply embrace it all, depending on what lights your particular Trek bonfire. Really dig that fanfic you read last week? Really _didn’t_ dig that Voyager ep you watched the next night? Fanfic, real. Voyager ep, hokey speculation.

Canon is a necessary framework for those _working_ on Trek material, but need play no part whatsoever in enjoying it.

22. ster julie - July 2, 2010

#17. Hey, I did the same thing with David Gerrold’s tribble-ations as he wrote that iconic TOS ep. Got a B+ which I argued up to an A, seeing that it was based on *fact* after all!

23. bill hiro - July 2, 2010

“That’s southern trailer trash name, not Iowa cornfield name!”

Tacky.

“Ask Peter David about the goofy crap he had to deal with from the empty suits at Paramount during his DC Comics run (and I assume his various novels). Completely inane stuff.”

Apparently that was all down to Gene’s somewhat self-appointed ‘fan liason’ Richard Arnold, who was somehow delegated the job of reading and giving notes on those Trek comic scripts. He consistently ripped Peter David’s stuff to pieces (and Peter was a great Trek comics writer), so someone got the idea of submit one of Peter’s scripts under a different name and Richard had no complaints about it. Bizarre. So it wasn’t so much the traditional Star Trek boogeyman “The Suits” as it was one guy with an axe to grind against Peter David for reasons unknown.

24. Paul B. - July 2, 2010

21 – “Canon is a necessary framework for those _working_ on Trek material, but need play no part whatsoever in enjoying it.”

Well said! That’s the most lucid single sentence I’ve read about the issue of canon on these pages.

25. Doug Skywalker - July 2, 2010

wasn’t all information about Kirk’s parents from books?

26. Martin Pollard - July 2, 2010

23 – I remember something about the Arnold/David thing, back when David’s novel “Vendetta” (the follow-up to TNG’s BOBW) was published. Long story short: Arnold would shoot down so much stuff in Trek novels that it was turning them into mush, so David added a whole bunch of “Arnold bait” (example: Worf’s thoughts about Dr. Selar, the joke being that she was played by Suzie Plakson, who played K’Ehleyr) that would distract Arnold and allow him to sneak in more subtle stuff. What happened, though, is that someone behind the scenes who hated Arnold more than the fans did tipped off the upper honchos, who told him to leave “Vendetta” alone. Thus, we got the full novel, “Arnold bait” and all. (I may have misremembered some things, and the text file I had on this is long gone, but that’s the gist of it.) Rather amusing, I thought.

27. Bucky - July 2, 2010

^ Heh, maybe that’s where the “Holy shit” line in “Vendetta” came from. Which is awesome that it’s in there anyway.

28. GarySeven - July 2, 2010

I thought Gene Roddenberry himself wrote the novelization of The Motion Picture. In fact, I know he did. Did I misunderstand what was said in the article?

29. DJT - July 2, 2010

Back when kids used to read books.

Wow.

Those were the days.

30. S. John Ross - July 2, 2010

#28: All the article says (that I can see) is that the TMP novelization was the first Pocket Books Trek novel, and McIntyre’s was the second.

31. dwnicolo - July 2, 2010

Screw canon. To paraphrase Chairman Mao, My a hundred Star Treks bloom.

32. dwnicolo - July 2, 2010

Opps, excuse me, May a hundred Star Treks bloom.

33. Dr. Cheis - July 2, 2010

I’m still not convinced Nyota is actually Uhura’s first name. Spock had “no comment on the matter,” and Uhura dodged the question for quite some time. I prefer to think of it as her “nickname” or a name Spock called her affectionately.

34. Buzz Cagney - July 2, 2010

Put me down as another that enjoyed Vonda’s Enterprise: The First Adventure. It really caught the ‘feel’ of the show.

35. SChaos1701 - July 3, 2010

It was a good book.

36. captain_neill - July 3, 2010

I haven’t read every novel but read a lot of them. Always treated them as canon until it was contradicted in a episode or movie.

37. IcroBob - July 3, 2010

“Canon is a necessary framework for those _working_ on Trek material, but need play no part whatsoever in enjoying it.”

There’s so much truth in this statement I just had to change my pants.

38. Sebastian - July 3, 2010

#28.

It was my understanding (and not from this article) that Alan Dean Foster was the ghost writer for the novelization of Star Trek-TMP, using GR’s notes.

He was also the ghost writer for the original Star Wars novelization, published a year ahead of the movie in 1976.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Dean_Foster

Not an uncommon practice then or now.

39. Sebastian - July 3, 2010

My goof; the Wiki article confirms only the ‘rumor’ that ADF ghost writer of ST-TMP’s novelization, but I’ve heard elsewhere that this was in fact the case. Doesn’t matter; as Gene Roddenberry’s intent and vision is all over the book anyway. The articles I’ve read before (years ago) could very well be wrong, and if so, my apologies to the memory of GR as no disrespect was intended).
Everyone in the industry uses ghost-writers; IMO, it’s not a crime as long as the titled author’s intent and ‘flavor’ is there. William Shatner does it all the time.

As for Vonda McIntyre, I never really cared for Enterprise: First Adventure, but she’s written a few nice ones here and there. I also liked Ann Crispin’s sequels to “All Our Yesterdays”; “Yesterday’s Son” in particular was a nice read. Spock’s son “Zar” was his own David Marcus; a rebellious kid who doesn’t understand his father.

40. Jeyl - July 3, 2010

I love it. Rather than having these stories become canon, they simply steal certain elements and use them for their own purposes while still enforcing the notion that these stories never happened. What a waste.

41. MC1 Doug - July 3, 2010

I consider the Star Trek: Enterprise novels that have brought Cmdr. “Trip” Tucker back canon. The asinine way he was killed off in the final episode deserves to be ignored!

Alan Dean Fister has commented many times he did not write the novelization of ST-TMP.

42. MorbidGorn - July 3, 2010

“Canon is a necessary framework for those _working_ on Trek material, but need play no part whatsoever in enjoying it.”

Gospel truth right here.

and in complete agreement with 36.

I absolutely love it when an element from TrekLit is acknowledged on screen. I won’t say that “it becomes cannon” because like captain neill said, unless its contradicted on screen, its cannon.

If you’re not reading the novels, you are so denying so yourself so much further enjoyment of the characters you love.

43. Praetor Tal - July 3, 2010

Winona Ryder definitely not trailer trash. Also a good name for a much-beloved pulse pistol (or .22 rifle, in my case).

44. captain_neill - July 3, 2010

41

Agreed, I consider them canon myself.

45. Al - July 3, 2010

Why has Sulu got long hair and a moustache on that cover? More interesting than his name.

46. CarlG - July 3, 2010

@21: Just want to add to the love for this post. Preach on, bro! :D

@40: “… while still enforcing the notion that these stories never happened.”

As opposed to the honest-to-God, real adventures that the real Kirk, Picard, Sisko, Archer and Janeway are really having on the real starships that actually exist, for reals?

47. I'm Dead Jim - July 3, 2010

@ 2… This is no place for your bigoted comments and I’m surprised it hasn’t been deleted yet. Did someone named Winona make you cry when you were a baby, or maybe more recently? Pitiful!

48. CarlG - July 3, 2010

@45: If I recall correctly, during the course of the story Sulu transfers to a smaller, fighter-type ship whose captain is Sulu’s childhood hero (she fought off Klingon raiders that menaced the colony he grew up on). It’s a lot less spit and polish than the Enterprise, so he lets his hair and mustache grow out.

@43: You mean you didn’t call it Vera?!

49. Picard's Barber - July 3, 2010

I’m pretty sure that Scotty calls Uhura by her first name in ST:V amidst that whole crappy love sub-plot. Pretty sure it was Nyota too! Prove me wrong.

50. JHarris - July 3, 2010

The canon problem comes from the fact that every author had their own backstory for the characters, universe, etc. back then and it was confusing to keep track.

Also, perhaps Paramount didn’t want to burden new readers and authors with too much backstory (previous novels) that they cant enjoy/write a new one. The same problem is found in Star Wars, though canon policy is different there.

51. Simon - July 3, 2010

Ah, Vonda the Sulu Superfan. She was obsessed with the character.

52. Captain_Z - July 3, 2010

If the TNG crew really did “roll” with the X-Men, did Captain Picard realize that he was a decendant of Professor X?

53. denny cranium - July 3, 2010

I remember seeing an article in a paper suggesting that Kirk was going to die in the novel.
I recall being aghast at the death of Kirk and grabbed the book the day it came out.
I loved that book. Im gonna go and find it in my Trek library.

54. bill hiro - July 3, 2010

@ 39 – I cannot point you to a link, but I have seen Foster deny ghostwriting the STTMP novelization in print. He did a lot of novelizing back in the day but apparently just not that one. I dunno if Gene actually wrote it or if he farmed it out to another ghostwriter, but by his own admission, it wasn’t Alan Dean Foster.

55. Praetor Tal - July 3, 2010

@48 I liked Firefly, but I loved Farscape. :-) Both were cut down before their time.

56. S. John Ross - July 3, 2010

#42: “I absolutely love it when an element from TrekLit is acknowledged on screen”

I’m loving that, lately, more and more people doing Trek tie-in material are referring to each other’s stuff … It makes me wonder if Paramount have changed their policy on that stuff, since back in the creaky Ye Olden Dayes, there was a definite “divide and conquer” policy where if Joe was working on a licensed Trek comic and Jane had written a licensed Trek novel, Joe was _discouraged_ (or, depending on who your Approvals Guy was, even forbidden) from building on Jane’s stuff, lest it snowball and be mistaken by the fans for consensus. This policy forced a lot of splintering of alternate ideas (of course, it also gave us a lot of versions of things to pick from). Over the last decade and change this policy seems to have been either revised or relaxed, which is kind of exciting.

#46: “As opposed to the honest-to-God, real adventures that the real Kirk, Picard, Sisko, Archer and Janeway are really having on the real starships that actually exist, for reals?”

I can’t tell if your use of the phrase “honest-to-God” was just colloquial or meant as an added level of irony :)

57. SerenityActual - July 3, 2010

Like any franchise that goes multi-media, I tend to brake canon this way:

Movies/Television: One Universe
Novels: One Universe
Comics: One Universe
Audio Adventures: One Universe

This way unless something in it’s own universe contradicts another (ie: one novel contradicting another). I’m not worried about cross universe contamination.

58. nuSpock - July 3, 2010

#57–big problem there: the Countdown comics and the Nero comics are officially acknowledged as nuCanon in the same vein as last year’s film is…and play directly into the story thereof…

59. Bucky - July 3, 2010

52 – Damn straight he did, Captain Z!

60. S. John Ross - July 3, 2010

#58: “the Countdown comics and the Nero comics are officially acknowledged as nuCanon in the same vein as last year’s film is…”

Roberto Orci said otherwise, though, right here on this site.

I was hoping that one good thing we might get from a “new order” is a more tolerant approach to the canon, but (at least according to one member of the Supreme Court thingy) policy remains the same.

If I were allowed to write the rules (and I’m certainly not) Trek canon would be abolished entirely, and replaced by the concept of Trek _history._ The “reality” of the Trek universe would be presumed to be a “history” of a fictional universe, and each film and show would be presumed to be exactly as accurate as, say, a Hollywood biopic or a movie about the Civil War. That is to say, even the screen-stuff wouldn’t be considered “canon” anymore, just a well-researched _dramatization_ of unseen “historical” events rather than a literal window into them.

Of course, for this, the canonistas would lynch me …

So would the people who believe that canon ever limited the kinds or number of stories that could be told, since the last shred of that silly argument would whip away in the breeze ;)

61. LCDR Arch - July 3, 2010

This is the best audio book as well! One of my favorit ST books.

62. IcroBob - July 3, 2010

“If I were allowed to write the rules (and I’m certainly not) Trek canon would be abolished entirely, and replaced by the concept of Trek _history._ The “reality” of the Trek universe would be presumed to be a “history” of a fictional universe, and each film and show would be presumed to be exactly as accurate as, say, a Hollywood biopic or a movie about the Civil War. That is to say, even the screen-stuff wouldn’t be considered “canon” anymore, just a well-researched _dramatization_ of unseen “historical” events rather than a literal window into them.

Of course, for this, the canonistas would lynch me …”

As long as you’d be willing to actually give a rat’s ass about The Star Trek Chronology by Mike Okuda, I’d support this idea!

If I’m not entirely mistaken, Roddenberry thought the same about TOS. It happened, but not quite as depicted in the series (THE KLINGONS ALWAYS HAD RIDGES!!!).

63. IcroBob - July 3, 2010

#58: “the Countdown comics and the Nero comics are officially acknowledged as nuCanon in the same vein as last year’s film is…”

Roberto Orci said otherwise, though, right here on this site.

Hehe, yeah, that was fun. I believe it was here months ago. Somebody asked him to explain some inconsistencies between the movie and the comic, and the answer was something like “Because the comic isn’t canon.”

Which is a bit sad/funny because I thought Orci was involved in creating the story of the comic. ;-)

64. Sebastian - July 3, 2010

#54

Fair enough; my bad for not checking my sources. I believe you’re right.

: )

65. yoshi343 - July 3, 2010

Except, in Japanese Hikaru is a girl’s name… not a guy’s name……

66. bill hiro - July 3, 2010

Hey Sebastian, no criticism intended or implied in my earlier remarks. Just carrying on the discussion :-)

67. bill hiro - July 3, 2010

Oh duh – he said it right here on this site. Hooray for my OCD fannishness.

17. Alan Dean Foster – December 12, 2009
Roddenberry wrote the book. I had absolutely nothing to do with it.

http://trekmovie.com/2009/12/11/tmp30-the-adaptations-of-star-trek-the-motion-picture-%e2%80%93-the-novelization/#2386193

68. Bucky - July 3, 2010

63. The only time Orci said it wasn’t canon was just a way to brushing off a nitpick question and his response to it was “Easy, the comic isn’t canon?” Note the question mark. That’s not a definitive answer at all. Therefore ambiguity.

69. Sebastian - July 3, 2010

Bill hiro
No offense or criticism taken! :- )

To quote Kirk in “Wrath of Khan”;
“You go right on quoting regulations!”

Trust me, no offense taken. I should’ve fact-checked instead of going on a rumor of something I heard a bazillion years ago.
You were right.

ADF did ghost write a lot of sci-fi novelizations back in those days, and I’d read/heard shortly after the TMP novel came out that he did that one too (this was in pre-internet times, aka “The Dark Age” of information). Clearly a rumor.

Anyway, I only vaguely remember Entropy Effect; I just remember Sulu on the cover with long hair and a moustache. And another ‘mad scientist’ plot.
Not much else comes to mind, I’m afraid.
That was almost thirty years ago…

70. dep1701 - July 3, 2010

@49 “I’m pretty sure that Scotty calls Uhura by her first name in ST:V amidst that whole crappy love sub-plot. Pretty sure it was Nyota too! Prove me wrong.”

Sorry dude, but you’re wrong. He calls her ‘Uhura’ throughout , as in: “Uhura… I thought you were on leave.” ( her reply; “And I thought we were going together.” ). The closest he comes to calling her by another name is “Lassie” ( although it would have been amusing if ‘Lassie’ had turned out to be her first name… Lassie Uhura. Don’t think Nichelle would have liked it though.

Of course, if you want to argue about film/TV vs. novels and comics as canon, then TFF is one film that should be stricken from canon. As D.C. Fontana has said: Spock. Has. No. Brother.

71. Red Dead Ryan - July 3, 2010

The “Countdown’ comic isn’t canon. I remember just about a year and a half or so ago when the first issue came out, and Anthony asked Bob if the comic was going to be canon, and Bob said no because he felt there were people who would have opposed it. I think it was something along those lines, though I could be wrong.

72. Nachum - July 3, 2010

I remain convinced that Kirk calls Uhura “Nyota” in IV, right after they get the message from Earth and he asks her to replay the probe’s signal. He definitely says an extra word there, and it sure sounds like “Nyota” to me. But that may be my brain filling in the sounds I think they are.

Maybe someone else could tell me what he says.

73. S. John Ross - July 3, 2010

#62: “As long as you’d be willing to actually give a rat’s ass about The Star Trek Chronology by Mike Okuda, I’d support this idea! ”

Oh, of course. It would be regarded as a very well-researched historical timeline :)

#68: “The only time Orci said it wasn’t canon was just a way to brushing off a nitpick question and his response to it was “Easy, the comic isn’t canon?” ”

Well, I respect your optimism in finding the ambiguity there :) Bob also said on another occasion “I am not going to declare” the canonicity of the comics … so I suspect the ambiguity is intended (on a couple of occasions, Bob has “left it up” to us and/or the individual reader to decide, which I consider a very healthy attitude on his part. But it still leaves us only with ambiguity :) Well, that, and precedent … and precedent says that even the TMP novelization, by Roddenberry himself, is not canon (and yes, I think that’s silly, too, but there it is).

Now, I’m not defending that approach … I like Countdown and wish it _were_ canon (or better still, see my Fanboy Wish in a post above; I wish everything and nothing were simultaneously canon, or at the very least that we had the “Doctor Doom Robot” approach of the Star Wars EU), but in the meantime, Countdown was marketed as “official” – which is the same word they use for all kinds of approved “apocrypha.”

Given that the NuTrek universe canon is _exceedingly_ tiny at this point – just a couple of hours of film … and is likely to stay tiny since there’s no apparent plan for a TV series … I think this is an excellent time to switch (if only for that universe) to something more like the Star Wars EU approach, but it hasn’t happened yet :/

#70: “As D.C. Fontana has said: Spock. Has. No. Brother.”

I’d love for D.C. Fontana to be handed the keys to the whole universe.

And I don’t _just_ mean the fictional one :)

74. S. John Ross - July 4, 2010

(also, in fairness to Bob Orci, I think he may have no real choice but to maintain neutrality on the question, since he and his cohorts are the Supreme Court by agreement with Trek’s owners, but aren’t Trek’s owners themselves … if I understand the nature of their license/arrangement, which I readily admit I might not)

75. captain_neill - July 4, 2010

71

Treat it as canon as it gives Nero a bit more back story. Nero was not well developed in the movie.

76. CarlG - July 4, 2010

@56: Maybe I should have said. “honest-to-George-Murdock’s-giant-glowing-head-at-the-centre-of-the-galaxy” instead. :)

77. S. John Ross - July 4, 2010

#76:

[kneels respectfully]

Amen.

78. John in Canada, eh? - July 4, 2010

I find it interesting that everyone’s mentioning Vonda’s “Enterprise” novel, but I’m not seeing the love for her trilogy of novelizations for Trek II, III, IV. These are easily the high-water mark for Trek writing, never surpassed before or afterwards. As I recall, her Trek III novelization goes for about 70 pages before even starting to touch on the events of the movie.
I was thinking a lot of her novelization of Trek III this week, with its opening scenes of a wake for Spock and Scotty’s nephew Peter Preston. I have to bury my son tomorrow, and I know I’ll be thinking about her words and scenes many times during the funeral and wake.

79. bill hiro - July 4, 2010

I’m very sorry for you loss, John. My sincere sympathies.

80. bill hiro - July 4, 2010

@ S. John Ross and “I’d love for D.C. Fontana to be handed the keys to the whole universe.”

I think I love you.

Also, on the topic of “The Entropy Effect”, I always enjoyed the George Takei audio version, “with Leonard Nimoy as the voice of Spock”. I have fond memories of many a school night in jr. high ahd high school spent staying up too late listening to those old Simon & Schuster Audio Works cassettes, particualrly the early ones with George, Leonard and Jimmy Doohan.

81. S. John Ross - July 4, 2010

#78: Condolences, sir. Can’t begin to imagine how difficult that might be :( And agreement on the high quality of McIntyre’s novelizations.

#80: Aye, likewise. And thank you for the nod of affection and solidarity re Fontana.

82. Canadianknight - July 4, 2010

#17 – “This was one of my favorite novels in the Trek fiction library. I turn a scene from it into a screenplay for an assignment in a creative writing class back in college. I used the scene where Kirk is shot with the spiderweb bullet.”

LMAO! I did the same thing for a writing class. Even went so far as to cast the roles of Mordreaux, Flynn and Braithewaite. (Don’t remember who I used now… wish I’d kept a copy!)

Entropy Effect.. always one of my favs. Had the original ’81 printing, and wore it out. I have a newer copy in my library. Haven’t read it in a while…

*goes off to rummage through the Trek bookshelf*

83. OLLEY OLLEY OLLEY - July 5, 2010

It has been 20 years since I read this book, but I seem to recall an acquaintance of Sulus given command of a Galaxy class starship.

This book was first published years before TNG, but it was starship that literally sailed between the Galaxies using Transwarp technology

84. Ralph F - July 5, 2010

Still one of my favorite TREK novel outings; one of the first paperbacks I can clearly remember buying (with my own money) and reading, was one of the first I bought after losing my collection to Katrina to re-read. Was also one of my first Kindle eBook purchases.

85. Battle-scarred Sciatica - July 5, 2010

#41
Alan Dean FISTER?!!?
Thats sooooo wrong…………

86. Joel1245 - July 5, 2010

@#8 Vultan

That’s probably because #2 is an idiot and doesn’t take in consideration anyone else on this board who may have the name of Winona (btw, I don’t). Easily said when you 1) don’t have to say it in a group of people face to face, and 2) don’t give your own real name. Yeah, nice going there “Shinzon” (cough, cough).

87. S. John Ross - July 5, 2010

I suppose I should admit that the “S.” in “S. John Ross” does in fact stand for “Winona.”

I know, I know … but my parents, being southern trailer trash, weren’t exactly spelling-bee champs, let’s say. But phonetically, my first name is Winona (they _spelled_ it “Shinzon,” so I need to constantly correct people on its pronunciation, as you can imagine).

No relation to poster #2 though, thank … um … the glowy face thing at the middle of the whatsit.

88. Damian - July 6, 2010

The novels have always been considered the expanded universe of Star Trek. I always treated them as part of the story of Star Trek unless they are contradicted on screen. I love many of the novels and see no reason not to treat them as part of the continuing adventures. That’s especially true with all the relaunches. There is absolutely no chance of TNG, DS9, Voy or Ent. being seen on screen, so why not consider the relaunches part of the story. Are they canon, no, but does it matter, not really.

The early novels in the 80′s could be a little frustrating at times because there were times they contradicted each other. I’m fine with individual stories, but it was too bad they did not have someone in charge to maintain some continuity, at least to avoid contradicting another story. I can’t tell you how many times Starbase 12 was used for different stories in totally different places.

I found Enterprise: The First Adventure to have potential, but it was disappointing in the sense that some of the characters were not where they should have been. She seemed to have ignored “Where No Man Has Gone Before.” Margaret Wander Bonanno did try to fix some of that with her follow up book “Strangers from the Sky.” (I remember one paragraph that goes on to explain why McCoy was on board when Kirk took command, and then left and how Dr Piper came on board).

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